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Wood Sorrel! The Cherokee ate wood sorrel to cure sores in their mouths and the Kiowa Indians chewed on the plant to keep from being thirsty. The root can be boiled and eaten and they taste just like a potato.

Wood Sorrel! The Cherokee ate wood sorrel to cure sores in their mouths and the Kiowa Indians chewed on the plant to keep from being thirsty. The root can be boiled and eaten and they taste just like a potato.

5 Pack Live Partridge Berry Vines Mitchella Repens

5 Pack Live Partridge Berry Vines Mitchella Repens for Terrariums

Early Spring Foraging: Garlic Mustard - Real Food - MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Early Spring Foraging: Garlic Mustard - Real Food

Corn mint -- leaves may be dried or used fresh in herbal teas or culinary dishes. The herb may also be used to help repel rodents and insects. Native American tribes traditionally used wild mint to treat a wide variety of health concerns including fevers, flu, pneumonia, headaches, heart issues, colds and diarrhea.

Corn mint -- leaves may be dried or used fresh in herbal teas or culinary dishes. The herb may also be used to help repel rodents and insects. Native American tribes traditionally used wild mint to treat a wide variety of health concerns including fevers, flu, pneumonia, headaches, heart issues, colds and diarrhea.

Nettles contains formic acid, galacturonic acid, vitamin C, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, choline and acetylcholine, vitamins A and D, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium (29 times more than spinach), magnesium, silica, trace minerals and protein (more than beans).  A super food.

Nettles contains formic acid, galacturonic acid, vitamin C, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, choline and acetylcholine, vitamins A and D, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium (29 times more than spinach), magnesium, silica, trace minerals and protein (more than beans). A super food.

The mayapple had an important place in the primitive medicine of the Native Americans & early settlers. The plant was used to treat certain warts & the roots were used to treat jaundice, fever, liver ailments, & syphilis. The mayapple is still used today in folk medicine in some areas of the Appalachian Mountains. A tea  made from the roots is used to treat constipation. Source: USDA Forest Service Publication, October 6, 1973.

The mayapple had an important place in the primitive medicine of the Native Americans & early settlers. The plant was used to treat certain warts & the roots were used to treat jaundice, fever, liver ailments, & syphilis. The mayapple is still used today in folk medicine in some areas of the Appalachian Mountains. A tea made from the roots is used to treat constipation. Source: USDA Forest Service Publication, October 6, 1973.

Comfrey: Great for chickens, good for digestive disorders, very high in protein, only know plant source of B12.

Comfrey: Great for chickens, good for digestive disorders, very high in protein, only know plant source of B12.

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