“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many...

A rare image of Annie Oakley. Why rare? . . . In this beautiful photograph of Annie she's is not holding a gun! Annie had a border collie!

Madame Walker: Born Sarah Breedlove on December 23,1867 on a LA plantation,a daughter of former slaves (who was orphaned at age seven and worked in the cotton fields as a child) transformed herself from farm laborer and laundress into one of he 20th century's most successful, self-made entrepreneurs.Walker made most of her fortune between 1911 and 1917 making Madam C.J. Walker the 1st Afri. Amer. woman to become a millionaire. She lived in a mansion near the Rockefellers. Biddy Craft

Between the years of 1882 and 1968 4,743 people were lynched on American soil-3,446 of them where African American.The women above is Laura Nelson who was hung on a bridge over the North Canadian River along side her 15 yr old son, Lawrence Nelson. The pictures of the lynchings where later sold as postcards. Horrible...how could someone do this to another human being? And then to make them into postcards. Absolutely sickening!

26-year-old Associated Press photographer Jack Thornell famously captured this Pulitzer Prize-winning image of James Meredith, the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi, after he was wounded by a sniper while leading a march to encourage African Americans to vote. When the attack happened, Thornell was sitting in his car; he took two rolls of pictures of Meredith, but never put down his camera to offer his wounded subject help.

On the 70th Anniversary of the Execution of Sophie Scholl, 22 February 1943 - Sophie Scholl was a German woman executed by the Nazis for distributing anti-Nazi pamphlets. Prison officials, in later describing the scene, emphasized the courage with which she walked to her execution. Her last words were: "How can we expect righteousness to prevail when there is hardly anyone willing to offer themselves up individually for a righteous cause? Such a fine, sunny day, and I have to go."

Many Native Americans welcomed African Americans into their villages. Even as slaves many African Americans became part of a family group, and many intermarried with Native Americans - thus many later became classified as Black Indians

african native american

Elizabeth Freeman, or Mum Bett as she was also known, was one of the first enslaved African Americans in the state of Massachusetts to file a “freedom suit,” or a legal petition for freedom. Her 1781 county court case, Brom and Bett v. Ashley, was a direct challenge to the existence of slavery in Massachusetts and her victory set the precedent for a later Massachusetts Supreme Court’s ruling that marked the informal ending of slavery in the state.

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Lucy Craft Laney (April 13, 1854 – October 24, 1933) was an early African American educator who was the first to establish a school for African American children in Augusta, Georgia. She was born in Macon, Georgia, to former slaves. Although it was illegal for blacks to read at the time of her birth, she was taught by a slave owner's sister, and by 1869 she was enrolled in Atlanta University. Enrollment in her first school in Macon was only 6; by 1928 it had grown to over 800 students.

Charlayne Hunter (1961) leaving the University of Georgia campus after registering as a student. She holds a place in Georgia civil rights history as one of the first two African American students (the other student was Hamilton Holmes) admitted to the University of Georgia. Also known for her career as an award-winning journalist, Hunter-Gault is respected for her work on television and in print.

Jim Beckwourth was an African American who played a major role in the early exploration and settlement of the American West. Although there were people of many races and nationalities on the frontier, Beckwourth was the only African American who recorded his life story, and his adventures took him from the everglades of Florida to the Pacific Ocean and from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

Though born into slavery Biddy Mason gained freedom for herself and her children in 1856. Only ten years later she had saved enough money to purchase property, making her the first African American women to own land in Los Angeles. A nurse and midwife by profession, she helped found the first elementary school for African American children in Los Angeles,

Samuel Decker was a Civil War veteran who built his own prosthetics after losing his arms in combat.

Though she was born to a prominent family, Kate would grow up to be just one of the many "soiled doves" of the American West, as well claiming a small slice of fame as Doc Holliday's on and off girlfriend. Born Mary Katherine Haroney in Hungary on November 7, 1850

RANGERS: Early Texas Rangers Perhaps the most storied lawmen of the West were the Texas Rangers. Comanches, not outlaws, were the principle adversaries of the Rangers in the years immediately following the Civil War. Photos of Texas Rangers taken prior to 1870 are rare. This one of James Thomas Bird (left) and John J. Haynes was taken in 1868 and shows the young Indian fighters outfitted more like Civil War guerrillas than the later Texas cowboys.

Black people did not "come to this country seeking a better life." They were kidnapped from their homes in Africa, dragged in chains and loaded onto slave ships--treated not like human beings but like things, commodities to be traded and used to enrich others. Tens of millions of enslaved Africans died before even reaching America, so terrible were the conditions on the slave ships. Those who survived the trip and were then sold to plantation owners.

The real-life Django: The legendary African-American Wild West marshal who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men Bass Reeves was born a slave in 1838 and later broke from his owner to live among Native Americans Reeves became a Deputy U.S. Marshal in 1875 at the age of 38 During his 32-year career as a Deputy Marshal he arrested 3,000 felons, killed 14 men and was never shot

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author of outstanding books for children and young adults

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, born in Texas in 1892, was the first female African American pilot, and the first African American to obtain an international pilot’s license.