Explore Combian Textiles, Bolivian Textiles, and more!

Explore related topics

Tunic with Serpents, ca. 800–950
Peru, south highlands, Wari-related style
Camelid hair, cotton; tapestry weave; 29 3/8 x 40 in. (74.6 x 101.6 cm)
Private Collection

Tunic with Serpents, ca. 800–950 Peru, south highlands, Wari-related style Camelid hair, cotton; tapestry weave; 29 3/8 x 40 in. (74.6 x 101.6 cm) Private Collection

Huari textile fragment; possibly part of a sleeved tunic; camelid tapestry weave; design is structured in columns with main field featuring oblong...

Huari textile fragment; possibly part of a sleeved tunic; camelid tapestry weave; design is structured in columns with main field featuring oblong...

Ancient Egypt Ornaments (Owen Jones’s The Grammar of Ornament Originally published in 1856). Examples of Egyptian patterns with the shared colour palette of blues, greens, golds and reds

Ancient Egypt Ornaments (Owen Jones’s The Grammar of Ornament Originally published in 1856). Examples of Egyptian patterns with the shared colour palette of blues, greens, golds and reds

Necropolis manto (cloak or mantle), Paracas, Peru, ca.500 BC | Museum of Archaeology, Anthroplogy and History of Peru, Lima

Necropolis manto (cloak or mantle), Paracas, Peru, ca.500 BC | Museum of Archaeology, Anthroplogy and History of Peru, Lima

This spectacular tunic is of the style of the Huari Empire, which wielded influence throughout much of what now constitutes Peru over 1,000 years ago...   among the most finely-woven textiles in the world. Six to nine miles of very fine yarn was required to make one tunic.... achieved entirely by hand. This amazing virtuosity suggests a specialized workforce of spinners and weavers, perhaps under the patronage of the state or religious establishment.

This spectacular tunic is of the style of the Huari Empire, which wielded influence throughout much of what now constitutes Peru over 1,000 years ago... among the most finely-woven textiles in the world. Six to nine miles of very fine yarn was required to make one tunic.... achieved entirely by hand. This amazing virtuosity suggests a specialized workforce of spinners and weavers, perhaps under the patronage of the state or religious establishment.

Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
Search