Smartphone Bow Mount by Midwest Orion, http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BVF6V5Q/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_.IXZrb16Z6EEW

Smartphone Bow Mount by Midwest Orion, http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BVF6V5Q/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_.IXZrb16Z6EEW

Bow Hyperaccuracy: Levi Morgan's Seven Steps to a Perfect Tune | Field & Stream

Bow Hyperaccuracy: Levi Morgan's Seven Steps to a Perfect Tune | Field & Stream

Bow Hyperaccuracy: Levi Morgan's Seven Steps to a Perfect Tune | Field & Stream

Bow Hyperaccuracy: Levi Morgan's Seven Steps to a Perfect Tune | Field & Stream

Learning where to hang your treestands and when to hunt them is one of the most important things you can do in order to become a better deer hunter.

Learning where to hang your treestands and when to hunt them is one of the most important things you can do in order to become a better deer hunter.

The "Rack Trap" ... I've seen a few with different types of wiring to catch the antlers. These look like elastic bands which (I'd like to think) that if the antlers weren't ready to drop the buck wouldn't get tangled.  What do you all think?

The "Rack Trap" ... I've seen a few with different types of wiring to catch the antlers. These look like elastic bands which (I'd like to think) that if the antlers weren't ready to drop the buck wouldn't get tangled. What do you all think?

I’m amazed when I hear archers debating the pros and cons of shooting with either one or both eyes open. Physiologically speaking, monocular vision (closing one eye) diminishes both peripheral field of view and depth perception. In essence, you’re half-blind when you aim with one eye. With a complete field of view, you can acquire your target considerably quicker than you can with one eye closed. If an animal is moving left or right in your periphery and you close one eye, you’ll lose it…

I’m amazed when I hear archers debating the pros and cons of shooting with either one or both eyes open. Physiologically speaking, monocular vision (closing one eye) diminishes both peripheral field of view and depth perception. In essence, you’re half-blind when you aim with one eye. With a complete field of view, you can acquire your target considerably quicker than you can with one eye closed. If an animal is moving left or right in your periphery and you close one eye, you’ll lose it…

Pinterest
Search