Jefferson loved music, and he played the violin while his daughter played the London-made harpsichord in Monticello's lofty parlor, with the light of its many windows reflected by the huge mirrors--enlightenment indeed.  Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

Jefferson loved music, and he played the violin while his daughter played the London-made harpsichord in Monticello's lofty parlor, with the light of its many windows reflected by the huge mirrors--enlightenment indeed. Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

Pediment at Monticello

Pediment at Monticello

The Tea Room was a dining area and a reading and writing area for Jefferson. Jefferson referred to the room as his "most honorable suite" because in it he displayed many likenesses of his friends and American heroes, including busts of Benjamin Franklin, John Paul Jones, Marquis de Lafayette, and Washington. Additional features include the double pocket doors on rollers separate the western-most, and coldest, Tea Room from the Dining Room.

The Tea Room was a dining area and a reading and writing area for Jefferson. Jefferson referred to the room as his "most honorable suite" because in it he displayed many likenesses of his friends and American heroes, including busts of Benjamin Franklin, John Paul Jones, Marquis de Lafayette, and Washington. Additional features include the double pocket doors on rollers separate the western-most, and coldest, Tea Room from the Dining Room.

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