A young restorer, sensing that a dining room door was too thick to have been made in 1802, looked carefully, pried the door apart, and discovered two of the original mirrored doors had been glued together. Now they are back where they belong.  The mirrored doors originally reflected the view out the bow window at the other end of the room, through which Hamilton could see the Hudson River and Long Island Sound. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

A young restorer, sensing that a dining room door was too thick to have been made in 1802, looked carefully, pried the door apart, and discovered two of the original mirrored doors had been glued together. Now they are back where they belong. The mirrored doors originally reflected the view out the bow window at the other end of the room, through which Hamilton could see the Hudson River and Long Island Sound. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

In the parlor, the chairs, card table, and piano all were part of Hamilton's original furniture. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

In the parlor, the chairs, card table, and piano all were part of Hamilton's original furniture. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

As the Entrance Hall shows, Hamilton Grange, designed by New York City Hall architect John McComb, is architecturally very ambitious for such a small house. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

As the Entrance Hall shows, Hamilton Grange, designed by New York City Hall architect John McComb, is architecturally very ambitious for such a small house. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

After being moved from its original site and wedged in sideways between a church and an apartment building, Hamilton Grange his just been restored beautifully by the National Park Service, which also replaced its porches, portico, and roof balustrade, stripped off in the 1889 move. The house still sits on a corner of Hamilton's original 35-acre Harlem Heights site. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

After being moved from its original site and wedged in sideways between a church and an apartment building, Hamilton Grange his just been restored beautifully by the National Park Service, which also replaced its porches, portico, and roof balustrade, stripped off in the 1889 move. The house still sits on a corner of Hamilton's original 35-acre Harlem Heights site. National Park Service Photographer Kevin Daley

In Monticello's Dining Room, a dumbwaiter concealed by the fireplace allowed wine bottles to be sent up from the cellar, and an ingenious Lazy-Susan allowed platters of food to be rotated in from the pantry, without any slave ever being seen.  Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

In Monticello's Dining Room, a dumbwaiter concealed by the fireplace allowed wine bottles to be sent up from the cellar, and an ingenious Lazy-Susan allowed platters of food to be rotated in from the pantry, without any slave ever being seen. Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

savannah dining room restored to original orange color . via john.fisch on flickr

savannah dining room restored to original orange color . via john.fisch on flickr

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