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The Great Hall at Stratford Hall often thronged with lavish, days-long house-parties, where the planter gentry, living on their vast, isolated estates, gathered to politic, gossip, and court. In the mid-eighteenth century, it was filled with music, too.

The Great Hall at Stratford Hall often thronged with lavish, days-long house-parties, where the planter gentry, living on their vast, isolated estates, gathered to politic, gossip, and court. In the mid-eighteenth century, it was filled with music, too.

The Jeffersons' bed in the South Pavilion, along with the original co-sleeper in which first-born daughter Martha slept.

The Jeffersons' bed in the South Pavilion, along with the original co-sleeper in which first-born daughter Martha slept.

Monticello, Parlor, 1912.  The pair of gilded pier mirrors were shipped from France in 1790 and installed by Jefferson before 1809, concealing two half round niches remaining from the first version of Monticello.  The have only been removed once during the 20th century structural upgrade of Monticello.

Monticello, Parlor, 1912. The pair of gilded pier mirrors were shipped from France in 1790 and installed by Jefferson before 1809, concealing two half round niches remaining from the first version of Monticello. The have only been removed once during the 20th century structural upgrade of Monticello.

George Washington's Mount Vernon Study.  Washington's study served as the center of his personal and professional operations before and after the presidency. It was the location where Washington performed the daily rituals of washing, shaving, and dressing, as well as the site where he conducted military, business, and political affairs. The room also was the place where Washington retreated when seeking refuge from the pressures of entertaining family, friends, and acquaintances.

George Washington's Mount Vernon Study. Washington's study served as the center of his personal and professional operations before and after the presidency. It was the location where Washington performed the daily rituals of washing, shaving, and dressing, as well as the site where he conducted military, business, and political affairs. The room also was the place where Washington retreated when seeking refuge from the pressures of entertaining family, friends, and acquaintances.

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