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    In Scandanavian folklore, nisse—household sprites— are responsible for the protection of homes. All they ask in return is respect and a bowl of porridge on Christmas Eve. A cheery holiday decoration. As the heat from the flame hits the metal blades of the fan, the nisse merrily spin. 6 ½" high. Made in Sweden. Use tea light only; included. $21.95

    Tomte on a Yule goat. "A tomte, nisse or tomtenisse is a mythological creature from Scandinavian folklore typically associated with the winter solstice and the Christmas season. It is generally no taller than three feet, has a long white beard and wears red or other colorful clothes. It is known as a gift bearer and is considered one of the Swedish and Norwegian versions of Santa Claus, although not entirely the same thing."

    La Befana - Italian folklore about an old woman who flies on a broom and comes down the chimney to deliver presents to good children on the night of Jan 5th (Epiphany Eve).

    Father Christmas typified the spirit of good cheer at Christmas. A traditional figure in English folklore, Father Christmas is identified with the old belief in the god Woden.

    Krampus is a beast-like creature from the folklore of Alpine countries thought to punish children during the Yule season who had misbehaved, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards well-behaved ones with gifts. Krampus is said to capture particularly naughty children in his sack and carry them away to his lair.

    Knecht Ruprecht, which translates as Farmhand Rupert or Servant Rupert, is a companion of Saint Nicholas as described in the folklore of Germany. He first appears in written sources in the 17th century, as a figure in a Nuremberg Christmas procession. Tradition holds that he appears in homes on St. Nicholas day (December 6), and is a man with a long beard, wearing fur or covered in pea-straw. Knecht Ruprecht sometimes carries a long staff and a bag of ashes, and wears little bells on his

    The Krampus

    Krampus is a beast-like creature from the folklore of Alpine countries thought to punish children during the Yule season who had misbehaved, in contrast with Saint Nicholas, who rewards well-behaved ones with gifts. Krampus kidnaps naughty children in his sack and takes them back to his lair.

    Baba Yaga (Slavic Folklore) is from the Slavic regions and is sometimes viewed as an evil witch or a female demon.

    faerie

    Robert Van Vorst Sewell (1860-1924) - Night Nymph

    Puck by Charles Vess (from A Midsummer Night's Dream)

    Edwin Landseer: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Titania and Bottom (detail), 1851.

    Namahage (生剥?) in traditional Japanese folklore is a demonlike being, portrayed by men wearing oversized ogre masks and traditional straw capes (mino(ja)) during a New Year's ritual of the Oga Peninsula area of Akita Prefecture in northern Honshū, Japan.

    Sápmi

    Laila Duran, author of "Scandinavian Folklore" and creator of the Folklore Fashion blog - an excellent place to learn about historical clothing from Norway and Sweden. www.http:/...

    tomte

    Nordic thoughts

    Nisse