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    Catacombs, Palermo

    3y
    3y Saved to Dust

    9 comments

    • Caique Lessa

      The Museum of the Dead. Palermo, where the corpses are treated as characters in a play... from cabinetmagazine.org

    • Hannah Elise

      In Sicily, Palermo. Capuchin Monastery, Capuchin catacombs. Pinned to the walls, sitting on benches and shelves and tucked away in open coffins are nearly 8,000 corpses, each one dressed in their Sunday best.

    • Hanni Buhlick

      In Sicily, where the relationship between the living and the dead has always been strong, the city of Palermo hosts one of the world's more bizarre and morbid tourist attractions: the Capuchin catacombs. Pinned to the walls, sitting on benches and shelves and tucked away in open coffins are nearly 8,000 corpses, each one dressed in their Sunday best.

    • LWrightG

      Palermo: Through the doors of the Capuchin Monastery, which looks like any other building from the outside, visitors can descend into the large Capuchin catacombs. Pinned to the walls, sitting on benches and shelves and tucked away in open coffins are nearly 8,000 corpses, each one dressed in their Sunday best.

    • Sharon Leo

      This saddens me In Sicily, the city of Palermo hosts one of the world's more morbid tourist attractions. Through the doors of the Capuchin Monastery, visitors can descend into the large Capuchin catacombs. Pinned to the walls, sitting on benches and shelves and tucked away in open coffins are nearly 8,000 corpses, each one dressed in their Sunday best.

    • Lyn E

      Sicily, where relationship between the living and the dead has always been strong, the city of Palermo hosts one of the world's more bizarre, morbid tourist attractions. Through the doors of the Capuchin Monastery, which looks like any other building from the outside, visitors can descend into the large Capuchin catacombs. Pinned to the walls, sitting on benches and shelves and tucked away in open coffins are nearly 8,000 corpses, each one dressed in their Sunday best.

    • MeLeah Suddith

      Capuchin Monastery catacombs in Palermo, Sicily

    • Hilary Smith

      Capuchin Catacombs - Palermo, Italy

    • Catherine McIntyre

      Palermo Catacombs

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