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    Bob Cole, left, with J. Rosamond Johnson. Robert Allen "Bob" Cole (July 1, 1868 – August 2, 1911) was an American composer, actor, playwright, and stage producer and director. In collaboration with Billy Johnson, he wrote and produced A Trip to Coontown (1898), the first musical entirely created and owned by black showmen. The popular song La Hoola Boola (1898) was also a result of their collaboration. Cole later partnered with brothers J. Rosamond Johnson, pianist and singer, and James Weldon..

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    • Norman Milton

      Explore Black History Album's photos on Flickr. Black History Album has uploaded 1101 photos to Flickr.

    • jan anderson

      Bob Cole (composer) - Wikipedia, Robert Allen "Bob" Cole (July 1, 1868 – August 2, 1911[1]) was an American composer, actor, playwright, and stage producer and director. In collaboration with Billy Johnson, he wrote and produced A Trip to Coontown (1898), the first musical entirely created and owned by black showmen.[2] The popular song La Hoola Boola (1898)

    • Binkys Diary Blog Bianca   Brown

      Bob Cole and Rosamond Johnson, songwriting partners and more -- by Black History Album, via Flickr. (And Rosamond was the brother of James Weldon Johnson)

    • Soulfrenchman From PARIS

      Bob Cole (seated) and J.R. Johnson, two of the earliest African American songwriters to succeed on Broadway

    • Jij

      Bob Cole and Rosamond Johnson, songwriting partners and more. (Rosamond was the brother of James Weldon Johnson.)

    • Selena Mosley

      Robert Allen "Bob" Cole (July 1, 1868 – August 2, 1911) was an American composer, actor, playwright, and stage producer and director. In collaboration with Billy Johnson, he wrote and produced A Trip to Coontown (1898), the first musical entirely created and owned by black showmen. The popular song La Hoola Boola (1898) was also a result of their collaboration. Cole later partnered with brothers J. Rosamond Johnson, pianist and singer, and James Weldon Johnson, pianist, guitarist....

    • Robyn Smith

      Bob Cole and J.R. Johnson, two early black songwriters who had success on Broadway

    • Sharon Cumberland

      Bob Cole and John Rosamond Johnson, Broadway musical composers

    • Andréa Fagim

      Songwriters Bob Cole (seated) and J.R. Johnson.

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