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This surgical set contains heavy-duty instruments for taking bodies apart after death. 1870

This surgical set contains heavy-duty instruments for taking bodies apart after death. 1870

Did Joseph Merrick, known as "elephant man," have Proteus Syndrome?

Did Joseph Merrick, known as "elephant man," have Proteus Syndrome?

Egils Bones An Icelandic saga tells of a Viking who had unusual, menacing features, including a skull that could resist blows from an ax. He probably suffered from an ailment called Pagets disease by Jesse L. Byock

This is a soldier of WWI, he was badly injured and had plastic surgery,  reconstruction of his jaw.

This is a soldier of WWI, he was badly injured and had plastic surgery, reconstruction of his jaw.

The Soap Lady is the name given to a woman whose body was exhumed in Philadelphia in 1875. The specimen is unique because a fatty substance called adipocere encases the remains. Adipocere formation is not common, but it may form in alkaline, warm, airless environments, such as the one in which the Soap Lady was buried.

The Soap Lady is the name given to a woman whose body was exhumed in Philadelphia in 1875. The specimen is unique because a fatty substance called adipocere encases the remains. Adipocere formation is not common, but it may form in alkaline, warm, airless environments, such as the one in which the Soap Lady was buried.

WOW!  I had no idea!  Tobacco Smoke Enema (1750s-1810s)  The tobacco enema was used to infuse tobacco smoke into a patient's rectum for various medical purposes, primarily the resuscitation of drowning victims. A rectal tube inserted into the anus was connected to a fumigator and bellows that forced the smoke towards the rectum. The warmth of the smoke was thought to promote respiration, but doubts about the credibility of tobacco enemas led to the popular phrase "blow smoke up one's ass."

WOW! I had no idea! Tobacco Smoke Enema (1750s-1810s) The tobacco enema was used to infuse tobacco smoke into a patient's rectum for various medical purposes, primarily the resuscitation of drowning victims. A rectal tube inserted into the anus was connected to a fumigator and bellows that forced the smoke towards the rectum. The warmth of the smoke was thought to promote respiration, but doubts about the credibility of tobacco enemas led to the popular phrase "blow smoke up one's ass."

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