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Univac Digital Trainer - [ The first computer I ever used. (1968) The UDT was totally useless for anything other than training in machine language programming, a bizarre specialty even in those days. It was 'state of the art' technology - transistors instead of vacuum tubes. - PSC ]

An IBM Key Punch machine which operates like a typewriter except it produces punched cards rather than a printed sheet of paper. -- I use to have a love/hate relationship with this machine. I used in it High School 1977-79, College for computer programming (1980-81), and up to 1990 while working with computers in the Air Force.

Teletype Model 33 - [ I was qualified (in theory at least) to work on these. In the U.S. Navy, they had a reputation for being bulletproof (reliable). I don't really know that for sure, because I never saw one that was heavily used. But they were a big seller in both the military and civilian versions for many years, and eventually enjoyed an active used market for computer hobby nerds. - PSC]

Texas Instruments Computer Game - Parsec. Wow... this totally brings back memories.

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50 Things Replaced by Modern Technology

Remember the days of disposable cameras and dialing *69 to see who called? Talk about ancient times. Here's a look at items replaced by modern technology.

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11 Big Tech Trends You'll See in 2013

From the death of the desktop to the rise of 3D printing, here's what you'll see in the technology of 2013.

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) was an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often considered the world's first computer programmer.

Shugart SA 400 minifloppy Disk Drive - [ The FIRST 5.25" floppy disk drive (1977). By today's standards it's totally laughable (measly 100Kbyte capacity & slow), but very useful for hobby computers and early PCs. I tested it thoroughly for Honeywell Information Systems, and it performed perfectly. It annoyed me that most people (even the other engineers) would take one look at a mini-floppy drive and call it "cute" - PSC]