Explore Fabrice Favard, Castle Sunset, and more!

Explore related topics

A grand country house near Glasgow city centre, Pollok House is Scotland’s answer to Downton Abbey and gives a real taste of upstairs/downstairs life in the 1930s.

A grand country house near Glasgow city centre, Pollok House is Scotland’s answer to Downton Abbey and gives a real taste of upstairs/downstairs life in the 1930s.

The Garden of Historic Roses contains a huge variety of roses, that span centuries of history! Types include Gallicas (some of the oldest roses in cultivation), Albas (which have a scent worth burying your nose in), Centifolia or cabbage roses (the rose of one hundred petals, often painted by  Renaissance artists), and Damask roses (these date back to the 16th century, and were used extensively in the perfume industry).

The Garden of Historic Roses contains a huge variety of roses, that span centuries of history! Types include Gallicas (some of the oldest roses in cultivation), Albas (which have a scent worth burying your nose in), Centifolia or cabbage roses (the rose of one hundred petals, often painted by Renaissance artists), and Damask roses (these date back to the 16th century, and were used extensively in the perfume industry).

Haddo House can only be described as an elegant mansion house with stunning late Victorian interiors. Noted for its fine furniture and paintings, Haddo also has a terraced garden leading to the Country Park with lakes, walks and monuments.

Haddo House can only be described as an elegant mansion house with stunning late Victorian interiors. Noted for its fine furniture and paintings, Haddo also has a terraced garden leading to the Country Park with lakes, walks and monuments.

The original house, called Whitehill, was built by James Smith around 1686. Despite being Scotland’s ‘most experienced architect’ of the time, financial difficulties forced Smith to sell the house just a decade or so later to the Bellendens of Broughton. Sir David Dalrymple purchased it shortly afterwards in 1709 and renamed it New Hailes.

The original house, called Whitehill, was built by James Smith around 1686. Despite being Scotland’s ‘most experienced architect’ of the time, financial difficulties forced Smith to sell the house just a decade or so later to the Bellendens of Broughton. Sir David Dalrymple purchased it shortly afterwards in 1709 and renamed it New Hailes.

Pinterest
Search