HMS Indefatigable, HMAS Australia and HMS New Zealand - the second class of British 12 in battlecruisers after the 'Invincibles'.  Australia missed the Battle of Jutland in May 1916 due to an earlier collision with her sister New Zealand, which fired more main armament shells than any other capital ship.  Indefatigable was the first ship sunk.

HMS Indefatigable, HMAS Australia and HMS New Zealand - the second class of…

HMS Iron Duke was a dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of her class, named in honour of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. She was built by Portsmouth Dockyard, and her keel laid in January 1912. Launched ten months later, she was commissioned into the Home Fleet in March 1914 as the fleet flagship. She was armed with a main battery of ten 13.5-inch (340 mm) guns and was capable of a top speed of 21.25 knots (39.35 km/h; 24.45 mph).

HMS Iron Duke was a dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of…

British battlecruiser HMS Invincible chasing the fleeing enemy at full power during the Battle of the Falkland Islands in December 1914 and showing the signs of her recent high speed voyage South to avenge the defeat at Coronel.

HMS INVINCIBLE, the first ever battlecruiser, seen here working up to 26 knots at the First Battle of The Falklands.

HMS Renown (1916), was the lead ship of her class of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy built during the First World War. During WWII, Renown was involved in the search for the Admiral Graf Spee in 1939, participated in the Norwegian Campaign of April–June 1940 and the search for the German battleship Bismarck in 1941. She spent much of 1940 and 1941 assigned to Force H at Gibraltar, escorting convoys and she participated in the inconclusive Battle of Cape Spartivento.

lex-for-lexington: “Battlecruiser HMS Renown off Plymouth, England, 2 August ”

12 in battlecruiser HMS New Zealand - present at most of the significant WW1 actions (she fired more main armament rounds than any other capital ship at Jutland), she was gifted to the British by the New Zealand government.  They finished paying for her in 1958.

2 in battlecruiser HMS New Zealand - present at most of the significant actions (she fired more main armament rounds than any other capital ship at Jutland), she was gifted to the British by the New Zealand government. They finished paying for her in

British Battleship HMS Revenge. Revenge fought at the Battle of Jutland on 31st May 1916 in Vice Admiral Sir Cecil Burney’s 1st Battle Squadron: picture by Lionel Wyllie

British Battleship HMS Revenge: Revenge fought at the Battle of Jutland on May 1916 in Vice Admiral Sir Cecil Burney’s battle squadron.

HMS Canada - building for Chile in Britain, she was taken over by the Royal Navy whilst under construction in 1915 and served for the duration of WW1 (including at Jutland) as the only 14 in dreadnought in the Grand Fleet. In 1920 she was returned to Chile, and was not scrapped until 1959.

Almirante Latorre, was a super-dreadnought battleship built for the Chilean…

British Battleship HMS Ajax. Ajax fought at the Battle of Jutland on 31st May 1916 in Vice Admiral Sir Thomas Jerram’s 2nd Battle Squadron

British battleship HMS Ajax at anchor, her crew painting ship in Grand Harbor, Valletta, Malta in (wikipedia.

Remembering the Battle of Jutland - https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/remembering-battle-jutland-ww1.html

A battleship squadron of the German High Seas Fleet. The far right vessel is a member of the Kaiser class. Date 1917

6 in Monmouth class armoured cruiser HMS Cornwall immediately after the Battle of the Falkland Islands on 8th December 1914. She sank light cruiser SMS Leipzig, thus avenging Monmouth herself (lost shortly before at the Battle of Coronel), sustaining 18 x 4.1 in hits in the process - though remarkably no casualties.

HMS Cornwall after the Battle of the Falkland Islands December Cornwall was hit by the German Cruiser Leipzig 18 times, but she did not lose a single man.

12 in dreadnought HMS Neptune was intended to be lead ship of a new class, but her 'sisters' Colossus and Hercules were so altered during construction that they were separately designated the Colossus class, leaving Neptune as a 'one off'. She introduced the super-firing turret to the Royal Navy, and fought at Jutland in 1916: though she fired only 48 main armament rounds she was credited with important hits on the battlecruiser SMS Lutzow, Germany's principal loss in the battle.

12 in dreadnought HMS Neptune was intended to be lead ship of a new class, but her 'sisters' Colossus and Hercules were so altered during construction that they were separately designated the Colossus class, leaving Neptune as a 'one off'. She introduced the super-firing turret to the Royal Navy, and fought at Jutland in 1916: though she fired only 48 main armament rounds she was credited with important hits on the battlecruiser SMS Lutzow, Germany's principal loss in the battle.

12 in battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable, lead ship of the second British battlecruiser class. She was the first casualty at Jutland on 31 May 1916, blowing up shortly after coming under fire from German battlecruiser SMS Von der Tann. There were only 2 survivors.

12 in battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable, lead ship of the second British battlecruiser class. She was the first casualty at Jutland on 31 May blowing up shortly after coming under fire from German battlecruiser SMS Von der Tann. There were only 2 survivors.

British Cruiser HMS Warrior. Warrior fought at the Battle of Jutland on 31st May 1916 in Admiral Arbuthnot’s 1st Cruiser Squadron. Warrior sank during 1st June 1916 due to damage she had suffered during the battle.

Warrior fought at the Battle of Jutland on May 1916 in Admiral Arbuthnot’s Cruiser Squadron. Warrior sank during June 1916 due to damage she had suffered during the battle.

HMS Ramillies, a Revenge-class super-dreadnought, entering port. Date and location unknown

'R' class super-dreadnought HMS Ramillies, late this class carried the same…

Helgoland  1916

Large gray battleship at sea. Dark smoke streams back from its three closely arranged funnels.

SMS Westfalen - one of Germany's older WW1 dreadnoughts, she found herself leading the German line at Jutland after Scheer's 'battle turn away'.

SMS Westfalen, date and location unknown. This ship was launched on July and was later scrapped in 1924 in Birkenhead, England.

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