Pearl Bailey was a famous actress and singer and Louie Bellson was a famous jazz drummer, composer and bandleader. Bellson was Duke Ellington’s first white musician and met Bailey after being introduced by a trombone player. After a courtship lasting just four days they were married, in London.

Pearl Bailey was a famous actress and singer and Louie Bellson was a famous jazz drummer, composer and bandleader. Bellson was Duke Ellington’s first white musician and met Bailey after being introduced by a trombone player. After a courtship lasting just four days they were married, in London.

With the perfect hourglass figure, backless dresses and silver tinted hair, jazz singer Joyce Bryant became known as  “The Bronze Blonde Bombshell.”

With the perfect hourglass figure, backless dresses and silver tinted hair, jazz singer Joyce Bryant became known as “The Bronze Blonde Bombshell.”

American musician of blues, singer, songwriter and guitarist - considered one of the greatest guitar players ever. Signed half-tone photo in sepia tone, probably from a page of a magazine, shown with

King, Riley B. (also known as B.B. King) - Signed Photo

American musician of blues, singer, songwriter and guitarist - considered one of the greatest guitar players ever. Signed half-tone photo in sepia tone, probably from a page of a magazine, shown with

Pearl Bailey & husband jazz drummer Louis Bellson were married 38 years. Reportedly fell in love while sharing a cab.

Pearl Bailey & husband jazz drummer Louis Bellson were married 38 years. Reportedly fell in love while sharing a cab.

Marpessa Dawn ~Repinned Via ☮Concerned Hippie Chick

Black Beauties To Know And Love: Marpessa Dawn

Ida B. Wells-Barnett: Long before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, a young school teacher refused to move from the Ladies Car on the train on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. When she was removed from the train, she sued and won proving that a woman of color could make her voice heard. Although the decision was later over-turned, Ida B. Wells-Barnett kept raising her voice, educating Americans and Europeans about the horrors of lynching, and other social injustices.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett: Long before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus, a young school teacher refused to move from the Ladies Car on the train on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. When she was removed from the train, she sued and won proving that a woman of color could make her voice heard. Although the decision was later over-turned, Ida B. Wells-Barnett kept raising her voice, educating Americans and Europeans about the horrors of lynching, and other social injustices.

Pinterest
Search