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Spring Flowers Reveal Their True Selves in Extreme Close-up, in images created by the award-winning German microscopy team "Eye of Science" - photographer Oliver Meckes and biologist Nicole Ottawa (image shown: Hibiscus stamens)

Spring Flowers Reveal Their True Selves in Extreme Close-up, in images created by the award-winning German microscopy team "Eye of Science" - photographer Oliver Meckes and biologist Nicole Ottawa (image shown: Hibiscus stamens)

Tardigrades, also known as water bears or moss piglets, are microscopic eight-legged animals that live in lichen, moss, dune grasses and in both marine and freshwater sediments. They have bizarre-looking tubular mouths and on each little foot can be found four to eight claws. Technically, they’re not insects, but related to nematodes.

Tardigrades, also known as water bears or moss piglets, are microscopic eight-legged animals that live in lichen, moss, dune grasses and in both marine and freshwater sediments. They have bizarre-looking tubular mouths and on each little foot can be found four to eight claws. Technically, they’re not insects, but related to nematodes.

Glassy Radiolarian Beauty The shells of radiolarians rank among some of the treasures of the ocean, with their intricate, gorgeous geometry. The shells are made of silica, which protects the single-celled animals as they drift as zooplankton in the ocean. This image, taken at 120x zoom, was an honorable mention in the 2012 Nikon Small World photomicrography competition.

Glassy Radiolarian Beauty The shells of radiolarians rank among some of the treasures of the ocean, with their intricate, gorgeous geometry. The shells are made of silica, which protects the single-celled animals as they drift as zooplankton in the ocean. This image, taken at 120x zoom, was an honorable mention in the 2012 Nikon Small World photomicrography competition.

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