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Delphi Museum

Delphi Museum

Archaic chryselephantine (gold & ivory) statue thought to represent Apollo. It is of a fire-blackened ivory w/a wooden core, & accentuated w/gold. 7th c. BCE, Delphi Museum

illvedere:Chryselephantine Sculpture -Thought to be a depiction of Apollo Fire-blackened ivory with gold on a wooden core — Greek — Century BCE — Belonging to the Delphi Archaeological Museum, Greece.

Ancient Grecian Sculpture - Photo by Richard Hatter* free paper toys at The China Adventures of Arielle Gabriel, new memoir The Goddess of Mercy & The Dept of Miracles, a mystic suffering financial ruination in Hong Kong and her miracles *

Marble head of a goddess, perhaps Aphrodite - gold and ivory statue, circa C. BC - at the Acropolis Museum, Athens

Statue of Athena Parthenos (the Virgin Goddess)  Roman, Imperial Period, 2nd or 3rd century A.D.  Roman-period replica of the cult statue that once stood within the Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis, a chryselephantine (gold and ivory) colossal statue designed by the master sculptor Phidias and . dedicated in 438 B.C.   (Source: The Boston Museum of Fine Arts)

ancientpeoples: “ Statue of Athena Parthenos (the Virgin Goddess) Roman, Imperial Period, or century A. Roman-period replica of the cult statue that once stood within the Parthenon on the.

Gold and fire-blackened ivory fragments of a burnt Archaic chryselephantine statue. Archaeological Museum of Delphi.

Women's head from a the gold and fire-blackened ivory fragments of a burnt Archaic chryselephantine statue. May represent Artemis - Greece

Minerva (Athena), Roman herm (marble), copy after Greek original from the school of Phidias, 1st century AD, (Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples).

Minerva (Athena), Roman marble copy after Greek original from the school of Phidias, century AD, (Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples).

Part of a “chryselephantine” statue (gold and ivory). It is believed to be a gift from king Kroisos to Delphi and presumed to be Apollo. It was burned in a fire. He holds a shallow offering-bowl. The enigmatic smile is typical of the Archaic period of Greek art and was made in Ionia the 6th c BC.

The sanctuary of Delphi, detail of the statue of Apollo, gift to the sanctuary from a century BCE Ionic city. Archaeological Museum of Delphi.

Archaeological Museum of Delphi:Remnants of three chryselephantine statues depicting perhaps the Delian triad- Apollo, Artemis, Leto. The statues were riveted to a wooden core with the faces, hands and feet rendered in ivory with golden decorations and jewellery. Apollo’s and Artemis’ features have been restored with wax but retain their original characteristics. The statues are probably the work of an Ionian or Samian workshop (6th century B.C).

Archaeological Museum of Delphi: “ Remnants of three chryselephantine statues depicting perhaps the Delian triad- Apollo, Artemis, Leto. The statues were riveted to a wooden core with the faces, hands.

A Florentine Lady - A lady carved of ivory wears a silver-gilt lace collar set with pearls. She recalls images of Marie de' Medici (1573-1642), the queen of France, as painted by the 17th-century masters Peter Paul Rubens and Frans Pourbus the Younger.  Moreau-Vauthier who sculpted in bronze, marble, and terracotta, is especially known for his work in ivory and chryselephantine (a combination of ivory and silver or gold). An eclectic sculptor, he was  adept at Gothic, Renaissance, and…

A Florentine Lady, Augustin Jean Moreau-Vauthier, French

This face is mesmerizing.  A chryselephantine (ivory and gold) archaic sculpture (could represent Apollo) at Delphi Archaeological museum, Greece.  Greek Sculpture - 6th Century BCE.

This face is mesmerizing. A chryselephantine (ivory and gold) archaic sculpture (could represent Apollo) at Delphi Archaeological museum, Greece.

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