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  • Wout Vergauwen

    August 28, 1963 - Between 200,000 and 300,000 people participated in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. As one of the 10 speakers, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his partly improvised "I have a dream" speech at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. In it, he called for an end to racism in the US, an aim not fully accomplished 50 years later, although his speech (and the march) invoked the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. #history #civilrights

  • Willis Bum

    From Remembering Martin Luther King Jr. in Photos, one of 37 photos. Civil rights leader Martin Luther King waves to supporters on August 28, 1963 on the Mall in Washington DC during the “March on Washington”. King said the march was “the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States.” Martin Luther King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. James Earl Ray confessed to shooting King and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. King’s killing sent shock waves through American society at the time, and is still regarded as a landmark event in recent US history. (AFP/Getty Images)

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