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Future Plate Tectonics | The process of tectonic plates movement continues. This is how ...

Future Plate Tectonics | The process of tectonic plates movement continues. This is how ...

Shake, Rattle and Slide : University of Illinois teaching resources for Earthquakes, Volcanoes, Glaciers and more (activities, glossary, teachers guide, etc.)

Shake, Rattle and Slide : University of Illinois teaching resources for Earthquakes, Volcanoes, Glaciers and more (activities, glossary, teachers guide, etc.)

#Eocene #Earth 50 - 55 million  years ago India began to collide with Asia forming the Tibetan plateau and Himalayas.  Australia, which was attached to Antarctica, began to move rapidly northward.

#Eocene #Earth 50 - 55 million years ago India began to collide with Asia forming the Tibetan plateau and Himalayas. Australia, which was attached to Antarctica, began to move rapidly northward.

#Carboniferous #Earth Time of Great Coal Swamps. By the Late Carboniferous the continents that make up modern North America and Europe had collided with the southern continents of Gondwana to form the western half of Pangea. Ice covered much of the southern hemisphere and vast coal swamps formed along the equator.

#Carboniferous #Earth Time of Great Coal Swamps. By the Late Carboniferous the continents that make up modern North America and Europe had collided with the southern continents of Gondwana to form the western half of Pangea. Ice covered much of the southern hemisphere and vast coal swamps formed along the equator.

The Carboniferous, 354-290 Million years ago. From -The Paleontology Portal

The Carboniferous, 354-290 Million years ago. From -The Paleontology Portal

Pangea Begins to Rift Apart. The supercontinent of Pangea began to break apart in the Middle Jurassic.  In the Late Jurassic the Central Atlantic Ocean was a narrow ocean separating Africa from eastern North America.   Eastern Gondwana had begun to separate form Western Gondwana.

Pangea Begins to Rift Apart. The supercontinent of Pangea began to break apart in the Middle Jurassic. In the Late Jurassic the Central Atlantic Ocean was a narrow ocean separating Africa from eastern North America. Eastern Gondwana had begun to separate form Western Gondwana.

Devonian, 417-354 Ma ago: by the Mid-Late Devonian, contin-ental movement increased re-sulting in numerous mtn-build-ing events. By 190 Ma ago, NA & EU collided to form a large continent, called Euroamerica, which sat near the equator. The Supercontinent Gondwana & Euroamerica were surrounded by subduction zones on all sides. Most of the landmasses were bunched up, & a vast ocean covered the rest of the planet

Devonian, 417-354 Ma ago: by the Mid-Late Devonian, contin-ental movement increased re-sulting in numerous mtn-build-ing events. By 190 Ma ago, NA & EU collided to form a large continent, called Euroamerica, which sat near the equator. The Supercontinent Gondwana & Euroamerica were surrounded by subduction zones on all sides. Most of the landmasses were bunched up, & a vast ocean covered the rest of the planet

Pangaea was a supercontinent formed by a series of continental collisions that began in the Late Paleozoic and continued into the early part of the Mesozoic.  The northern part of Pangaea, called Laurasia, includes most of present day North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia.  Gondwana is the southern part of Pangaea. It includes most of present day South America, Africa, India, Australia, and Antarctica.

Pangaea was a supercontinent formed by a series of continental collisions that began in the Late Paleozoic and continued into the early part of the Mesozoic. The northern part of Pangaea, called Laurasia, includes most of present day North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia. Gondwana is the southern part of Pangaea. It includes most of present day South America, Africa, India, Australia, and Antarctica.

During the Early Carboniferous Pangea Begins to Form. During the Early Carboniferous the Paleozoic oceans between Euramerica and Gondwana began to close, forming the Appalachian and Variscan mountains.   An ice cap grew at the South Pole as four-legged vertebrates evolved in the coal swamps near the Equator.

During the Early Carboniferous Pangea Begins to Form. During the Early Carboniferous the Paleozoic oceans between Euramerica and Gondwana began to close, forming the Appalachian and Variscan mountains. An ice cap grew at the South Pole as four-legged vertebrates evolved in the coal swamps near the Equator.

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