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Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue.

Nanoscientists at Argonne are working on a technique to attack brain cancer cells using these coin-shaped magnetic disks. Antibodies on the surface of the disks latch onto cancerous cells. Then, when a weak magnetic field is applied, the disks begin to oscillate, killing the cancer cells. The disks are just a single micron across – about 10 times smaller than the diameter of a single red blood cell. Though the technique is still in early stages of testing, it shows promise.

from Live Science

Amazing Photos: The Little Things in Life

This image shows Telophase HeLa (cancer) cells expressing Aurora B-EGFP (green).

from ScienceDaily

Nano scientists reach holy grail in label-free cancer marker detection: Single molecules

The Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology under Open Access category depicts the scientific and technological advances in the field of medical, biological and nanoscale sciences. The Journal includes the online, peer-reviewed research speculating the latest developments in the growing fields of medical and nanoscale technologies, owing to bring tremendous changes in medicine.

Nano-Bio sensor technology allows him to put the nano-bio sensor secretly into my brain through my ear as a liquid crystal form. Absorbs nutrition, and grows to large fully functional mesogen. Mesogens are a functional machines able to control brain fuctions.

from Inhabitat

MIT Develops Polymer Film That Harvests Energy From Water Vapor

Researchers at MIT just developed a new bio-polymer film that is able to generate electricity from a readily available source: water vapor. The material changes its shape as it absorbs evaporated water. As the bio-polymer film repeatedly curls and unfurls it drives robotic limbs, which in turn generate enough electricity to power micro- and nanoelectronic devices.