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Argonne materials scientist Swati V. Pol loads an in-situ lithium-ion battery into the low-energy resolution inelastic X-ray (LERIX) system at the Advanced Photon Source. This multi-element X-ray scattering instrument is helping Argonne researchers to understand the fundamental mechanisms that limit the performance of batteries.

These unique glass chambers allow Argonne researchers to conduct controlled environment testing of lithium-oxygen batteries. Created by Argonne glassblower Joe Gregar, the chambers are modeled after cells being used by Professor Peter Bruce's research group at University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

Yuko Shiroyanagi (right) and Chuck Doose of the Accelerator Science Division prepare the magnetic measurement test stand. Testing ensures that the super-conducting undulator for the Advanced Photon Source upgrade will meet the high-precision requirements needed to generate the world's brightest X-rays above energies of 25 keV.

Argonne battery researchers (from left) Khalil Amine, Chris Johnson, Sun-Ho Kang and Mike Thackeray flank a continuously-stirred tank reactor used to produce scaled-up quantities of cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Thackeray, Johnson, Amine and Jaekook Kim (not pictured) are co-inventors of a revolutionary cathode material used in the battery that powers GM's Chevrolet Volt.

Center for Nanoscale Materials Division Director Amanda Petford-Long (right) leads a tour of the CNM for Idaho National Laboratory Director John Grossenbacher (middle) and INL Deputy Director David Hill on February 18, 2010.

Jennifer Salazar is a Coordinating Writer and Editor in Argonne’s Computing, Environment and Life Sciences directorate. "I've found that our researchers want to share what excites them and communicate it to others in the wider research community or to the public, and this offers a great environment for a writer," she said.

Nuclear engineer Laural Briggs reviews pressure distribution results from a 217-pin fuel assembly simulation. The simulation was computed by Argonne's Nek5000 large eddy simulation tool on the IBM Blue Gene/P Intrepid supercomputer.

Chemist Lin Chen is recognized internationally for her ground-breaking contributions in the excited-state structural studies using X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. She was honored in 2012 as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for her "contributions to understanding structural dynamics of molecular excited states with special emphasis on problems related to renewable energy."

Argonne scientist Ira Bloom examines a metallographic sample using an optical microscope to determine its microstructure in the laboratory's Battery Post-Test Facility. This information helps researchers learn what chemical and physical changes have occurred during the aging of battery materials.

Lithium-ion battery cells are prepped for testing at Argonne’s Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory. With the lab’s state-of-the-art, custom-built equipment, simulations are performed to provide information on battery characteristics such as life cycle and calendar life.

From left, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu talk with Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) Director George Crabtree (center right) and Deputy Director Jeff Chamberlain (right) prior to the announcement of the creation of a five-year energy storage initiative led by Argonne on Nov. 30, 2012, in Chicago. JCESR brings together the national labs, academia and industry to help address the nation's energy challenges.