There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
Visit Site

Related Pins

Women @ Energy: Susannah Green Tringe "I think it's important to expose kids to science and scientists early, so they're comfortable thinking about science as something they can do. I also think labs and universities could do more to make scientific careers compatible with raising a family, which would benefit all young scientists and reduce attrition." Read more from Susannah here.

Marie Curie (1867-1934) Two-time Nobel laureate Marie Curie discovered polonium and radium, founded the concept of radiology and — above all — made the possibility of a scientific career seem within reach for countless girls and women around the world. The first woman to receive the Nobel Prize and the first female Professor of General Physics in the Faculty of Sciences at the Sorbonne in Paris, Curie was beloved by her colleagues for her calm, singular focus, lack of pretense and professional drive. Her work with radiation is now part of the most sophisticated cancer-treatment protocols in the world, though she herself succumbed to leukemia after decades of daily radiation exposure.

Najla Elmachtoub (Cornell U, 2013), a computer scientist that did Android development by doing design work and eventually leading the whole team. She's now in a master's program. she++: Inspiring Women to Empower Computer Science

Susana Reyes is a nuclear engineer at the Livermore Lab, and also the 2012 recipient of the American Nuclear Society Mary Jane Oestmann Professional Women's Achievement Award. In this photo, Susana shares career information with students at a local science and technology career fair.

Women In Engineering, Computer Science, Technology, Hall Of Fame - Infographic

Two-time Nobel laureate Marie Curie discovered polonium and radium, founded the concept of radiology and — above all — made the possibility of a scientific career seem within reach for countless girls and women around the world. The first woman to receive the Nobel Prize and the first female Professor of General Physics in the Faculty of Sciences at the Sorbonne in Paris, Curie was beloved by her colleagues for her calm, singular focus, lack of pretense and professional drive.

This is heinous. In Iran, due to government pressure, "over 30 universities have agreed to ban women from about 80 different degrees such as engineering, business, nuclear physics, and computer science (you know, the ones that can potentially steer women toward power and financial freedom)."

Physicist Francis Slakey: How a World Record Quest Led to a New Career in Policy

Scientist Rosalind Franklin made the first clear X-ray images of DNA’s structure. Her work was described as the most beautiful X-ray photographs ever taken. Franklin’s ‘Photo 51’ informed Crick and Watson of DNA’s double helix structure for which they were awarded a Nobel Prize. Franklin died of ovarian cancer in 1958, aged 37, her contribution to DNA’s discovery story unacknowledged.

Mildred Adams Fenton (1899-1995) was an American scientist, who wrote or co-authored (with her husband) dozens of textbooks on geology and earth science, including "The Rock Book" (1940), a popular classic.

Women Coal Miners, 1890 Can't imagine mining coal in a dress. The things women had to do!

helen richey (1909 – 1947) was a pioneering female aviator ... she was the first woman to be hired as a pilot by a commercial airline in the united states ... the first woman sworn in to pilot air mail and was one of the first female flight instructors