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AVIDAC, Argonne's first digital computer, began operation in January 1953. It was built by the Physics Division for $ 250,000. Pictured is pioneer Argonne computer scientist Jean F. Hall. AVIDAC stands for "Argonne Version of the Institute's Digital Automatic Computer" and was based on the IAS architecture developed by John von Neumann. Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.

Women @ Energy: Susannah Green Tringe "I think it's important to expose kids to science and scientists early, so they're comfortable thinking about science as something they can do. I also think labs and universities could do more to make scientific careers compatible with raising a family, which would benefit all young scientists and reduce attrition." Read more from Susannah here.

Marie Curie (1867-1934) Two-time Nobel laureate Marie Curie discovered polonium and radium, founded the concept of radiology and — above all — made the possibility of a scientific career seem within reach for countless girls and women around the world. The first woman to receive the Nobel Prize and the first female Professor of General Physics in the Faculty of Sciences at the Sorbonne in Paris, Curie was beloved by her colleagues for her calm, singular focus, lack of pretense and professional drive. Her work with radiation is now part of the most sophisticated cancer-treatment protocols in the world, though she herself succumbed to leukemia after decades of daily radiation exposure.

Mary Anning. After her brother discovered dinosaur fossils near a seaside cliff, Mary Anning (1799-1847) began a long career as a fossil hunter. She found hundreds, possibly thousands, of fossils that helped scientists to draw a picture of the marine world 200 million to 140 million years ago during the Jurassic.

Melba Roy, NASA Mathmetician, at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland in 1964. Ms. Roy led a group of NASA mathmeticians known as “computers” who tracked the Echo satellites. The first time I shared Ms. Roy on VBG, my friend Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a former postdoc in astrophysics at NASA, helpfully explained what Ms. Roy did in the comment section. I am sharing Chanda’s comment again here: “By the way, since I am a physicist, I might as well explain a little bit about what

Melba Roy, NASA Mathmetician, Ms. Roy headed a group of NASA mathmeticians known as “computers” who tracked the Echo satellites in 1964

Katherine Johnson, research mathematician and scientist who worked at NASA’s Langley Research Center 1953 to 1986, calculated the trajectory of the early space launches

Anita Borg - American computer scientist. She founded the Institute for Women and Technology (now the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology) and the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing.

Meet the amazing Bertha Benz: first woman driver to make a long distance trip by car.

Najla Elmachtoub (Cornell U, 2013), a computer scientist that did Android development by doing design work and eventually leading the whole team. She's now in a master's program. she++: Inspiring Women to Empower Computer Science

Two-time Nobel laureate Marie Curie discovered polonium and radium, founded the concept of radiology and — above all — made the possibility of a scientific career seem within reach for countless girls and women around the world. The first woman to receive the Nobel Prize and the first female Professor of General Physics in the Faculty of Sciences at the Sorbonne in Paris, Curie was beloved by her colleagues for her calm, singular focus, lack of pretense and professional drive.

Professor Tavi Murray (Swansea University) - physicist, computer scientist, glaciologist, and one of only 8 women to have been awarded the Polar Medal