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Rembrandt’s Mother Reading (c. 1629). Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (Dutch painter and engraver, 1606-1669). Wilton House, Wiltshire, England.    “Of all the Baroque masters, it was Rembrandt who evolved the most revolutionary technique and who seemed to grow into the Italians’ spiritual heir. By the middle of the 1630s he had long since abandoned conventional Dutch smoothness and his surfaces were already caked with more paint than was strictly necessary to present an illusion.”

Rembrandt’s Mother Reading (c. 1629). Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (Dutch painter and engraver, 1606-1669). Wilton House, Wiltshire, England. “Of all the Baroque masters, it was Rembrandt who evolved the most revolutionary technique and who seemed to grow into the Italians’ spiritual heir. By the middle of the 1630s he had long since abandoned conventional Dutch smoothness and his surfaces were already caked with more paint than was strictly necessary to present an illusion.”

Suze Robertson (Dutch painter) 1855 - 1922 Zelfportret met Rode Jurk (Self Portrait with Red Dress), 1889-90 oil on panel 50 x 40 cm. Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, The Netherlands

Suze Robertson (Dutch painter) 1855 - 1922 Zelfportret met Rode Jurk (Self Portrait with Red Dress), 1889-90 oil on panel 50 x 40 cm. Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, The Netherlands

It's About Time: From royals to peasants - portraits by Dutch artist Thérèse Schwartze 1852-1918

It's About Time: From royals to peasants - portraits by Dutch artist Thérèse Schwartze 1852-1918

It's About Time: Woman Artist - Self-Portraits - Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946)

It's About Time: Woman Artist - Self-Portraits - Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946)

A Girl Reading. Suze Robertson (Dutch, 1855-1922). Oil on canvas.  Robertson continued her studies at the Art Academy in Rotterdam. Here she created upheaval when she insisted on being admitted to the “Naaktklasse” (drawing of nude models). Robertson refused to be turned away. The result of her tenacity is later clearly visible in her work: her human figures, mostly women in daily life, are pictured with striking natural resemblance.

A Girl Reading. Suze Robertson (Dutch, 1855-1922). Oil on canvas. Robertson continued her studies at the Art Academy in Rotterdam. Here she created upheaval when she insisted on being admitted to the “Naaktklasse” (drawing of nude models). Robertson refused to be turned away. The result of her tenacity is later clearly visible in her work: her human figures, mostly women in daily life, are pictured with striking natural resemblance.

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