Black & white. Tudor wallpaper from the lining of a deed box from the Courts of Wards and Liveries.

Tudor wallpaper from the lining of a deed box from the Courts of Wards and Liveries.

TREASON'S ACT OF 1534 ~ PASSED BY PARLIAMENT OF ENGLAND DURING THE REIGN OF KING HENRY VIII.  PASSED AFTER THE ACT OF SUPREMACY WHICH MADE THE KING THE. "ONLY HEAD OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND ON EARTH". THIS ACT MADE IT TREASON, PUNISHABLE BY DEATH TO DISAPPROVE OF THE KING'S SUPREMACY.  SIR THOMAS MORE WAS EXECUTED UNDER THIS ACT.

TREASON'S ACT OF 1534 ~ PASSED BY PARLIAMENT OF ENGLAND DURING THE REIGN OF KING HENRY VIII. PASSED AFTER THE ACT OF SUPREMACY WHICH MADE THE KING THE. "ONLY HEAD OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND ON EARTH". THIS ACT MADE IT TREASON, PUNISHABLE BY DEATH TO DISAPPROVE OF THE KING'S SUPREMACY. SIR THOMAS MORE WAS EXECUTED UNDER THIS ACT.

Life in Tudor Britain was harsh - the average life expectancy was just 35 years. This picture depicts the farming society that was Tudor England.

Under Tudor rule England became a more peaceful and richer place. Towns grew larger and the mining of coal, tin and lead became very popular.

Engraving of Henry III's great seal

There are still laws dating from 1267 in the English law

Kings and Queens of England and Britain -

Kings and Queens of England and Britain - this is a great site for info (short bio on each) of the 66 Monarchs that have reigned over England/Britain in the past 1500 years.

Inscription by Mary I in a devotional book from her father's library. Adorable little crosses surround her autograph signature.

Inscription by Mary I in a devotional book from her father's library. Little crosses surround her autograph signature.

Replica of a Tudor 'birthing room'.  In some instances, midwives and mothers were aided by a birth chair, specifically designed for delivery. The seat of a chair would have a cut out, or key hole section where the midwife would have delivered the newborn.  The chairs also had a straight back that assisted gravity and moved the birth process forward to completion.

Replica of a Tudor 'birthing room'. In some instances, midwives and mothers were aided by a birth chair, specifically designed for delivery. The seat of a chair would have a cut out, or key hole section where the midwife would have delivered the newborn. The chairs also had a straight back that assisted gravity and moved the birth process forward to completion.

39_Articles (Elizabeth I (1558-1603), daughter of Anne Boleyn (Henry VIII’s second wife) was a resolute defender of Protestantism as the state religion of England)

(Elizabeth I daughter of Anne Boleyn (Henry VIII’s second wife) was a resolute defender of Protestantism as the state religion of England)

Anne Boleyn medal made during her pregnancy with Elizabeth.

Lucy Churchills wonderful Anne Boleyn medal - thanks to her talent and dedication, this almost destroyed image has been restored. the-tudor-time-warpe

Wolsey tomb - Although he was seriously ill, Wolsey was forced to make the journey south. On the way back, too ill to travel any further, he stopped at Leicester Abbey, where he was accomodated and cared for. On 29th November 1530, Wolsey died "of a bloody flux". He was buried in Leicester Abbey, in a dignified way with a nice tomb and memorial, but not the grand monument Wolsey had planned. The King had bagged that.

On November Wolsey died "of a bloody flux". He was buried in Leicester Abbey, in a dignified way with a nice tomb and memorial, but not the grand monument Wolsey had planned. The King had bagged that.

Nocturnal (c.1525 A.D.) a Tudor navigational instrument that was used to find a vessel's location and the time at night by observing the alignment of the stars.

Nocturnal: This navigational instrument was used to find a vessel’s location and the time at night by observing the alignments of the stars. This was replaced with the sextant.

Locket known as The Heneage Jewel or The Armada Jewel, painting by Nicholas Hilliard, about 1595. Museum no. M.81-1935. © Victoria & Albert Museum, London

The Heneage Jewel [locket] - also called 'The Armada Jewel', 1595 ~ painting by Nicholas Hilliard. "Elizabeth I gave elaborate jewels bearing her image as a reward for outstanding services. From the Victoria & Albert Museum

Royal Portrait of Elizabeth I

Miniature of Elizabeth playing the lute, one of her favorite instruments. Date unknown by Nicholas Hilliard

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