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    Florence Nightingale Taken: 1858 Discovered: 2006 Florence Nightingale is one of nursing’s most important figures. She gained worldwide attention for her work as a nurse during the Crimean War. She was dubbed “The Lady with the Lamp” after her habit of making rounds at night to tend to injured soldiers. Early photographs of Florence Nightingale are very rare because she was extremely reluctant to be photographed, partly for religious reasons

    Mental hospital nurses 1936 Absolutely fascinating article if you click through to the website printed in a 1930's LIFE magazine.

    Everything Was Fake but Her Wealth ~ Strange tale of Ida Wood, who checked into the New York Herald Square Hotel with her sister in 1907 — and never opened the door of her suite again until 1931, when the sister died. By then Ida was 93 and deaf, but far from destitute, thanks to 750,000 dollars in cash hidden around the room and 54 trunks of gowns and jewels in the hotel basement.

    'I never lost hope': Startling interview unearthed with woman behind iconic Great Depression image talking just five years before her death in 1983. FLORENCE LEONA THOMPSON Migrant Mother – A Legend of the Strength of American Motherhood.'

    The Victorian cure for "female hysteria" LOL

    40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit. Warning: Some of these will make you weep.

    florence nightingale

    One of the most amazing stories of any Titanic survivors, Violet Constance Jessop was an ocean liner stewardess and a nurse who survived the sinking of both the RMS Titanic and the HMHS Britannic in 1912 and 1916.

    Rare photo of Helen Keller and her teacher, Anne Sullivan, found nearly 120 years after it was taken. Shot in July 1888, possibly the earliest photo of the two women together.

    Rare Antique Early Photograph Of Children On Silk Victorian Silk Print Plus Box

    Maude Callen on duty, South Carolina, United States, 1951, photograph by W. Eugene Smith. Callen served as “doctor, dietician, psychologist, bail-goer and friend” to thousands of poor (most of them desperately poor) patients — only two percent of whom were white.

    Shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Colonel Ruby Bradley was captured by the Japanese in the Philippines. After her capture, she continued to work as a nurse in prisoner of war camps until 1945. She is the most-decorated woman in U.S. military history.

    Women in the civil war were not allowed unless they were nurses. Four hundred women served in the war. Some historical records show that over sixty women were wounded or killed in the war.

    Per the Pennsylvania Civil War 150 facebook page: This photo, from the collection of the Union Veterans of the Civil War, shows Alice Carey Risley, the last surviving Civil War battlefield nurse, receiving a kiss from a veteran.

    Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888): author of the novel Little Women (1868) and its sequels Little Men and Jo's Boys. Raised by her transcendentalist parents, Abigail May & Amos Bronson Alcott in New England, she grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, & Henry David Thoreau. Her family suffered financial difficulties & Alcott worked to help support the family. She sometimes used the pen name A.M. Barnard.

    Red Cross Nurses Playing Soccer, 1939

    Feminist and revolutionary Qiu Jin was born in 1875 in China. She was vocal about women's rights and pressed for better access to education for women. At the time it was still customary for women to have their feet bound at the age of five, rendering women crippled and severely dependent on others. Qiu Jin encouraged women to resist oppression by their families and by the government, and to gain financial independence through education. She was beheaded by the authorities at the age of 31.

    Sharon Tate, pregnant with their first child, in a photograph taken by Jay Sebring, the day before their murders.

    Edith Louisa Cavell - Was a British nurse who is celebrated for saving the lives of soldiers from all sides during World War I, for which she was arrested. She was found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. Despite international pressure for mercy, she was shot by a German firing squad. Her execution received worldwide condemnation and extensive press coverage. She is well known for her statement that "patriotism is not enough. I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved."

    A very powerful picture.

    The nurses behind the Nazi 'Super Race Children': Inside the Aryan breeding wards where boys and girls were given UV treatment if their hair turned brown