Cherokee Land Run. The Cherokee Strip.                          When the Cherokee were forced to settle in an area that’s now Oklahoma, they were given about 7 million acres in three separate areas. By the 1880s, though, the country was expanding, and ranchers and settlers needed that land. The US government made an offer to the Cherokee, attempting to buy the land at $3 an acre. The offer was refused, and in 1889, Congress ordered them to sell at $1.25 an acre. The Cherokee had been making…

Cherokee Land Run. The Cherokee Strip. When the Cherokee were forced to settle in an area that’s now Oklahoma, they were given about 7 million acres in three separate areas. By the 1880s, though, the country was expanding, and ranchers and settlers needed that land. The US government made an offer to the Cherokee, attempting to buy the land at $3 an acre. The offer was refused, and in 1889, Congress ordered them to sell at $1.25 an acre. The Cherokee had been making…

The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889. The rush began at "high noon on April 22,1889," and over 50,000 people came to claim their land! In May of the same year, the land they claimed officially became Oklahoma territory.   Come see our exhibit about the first Edmond settlers at the Edmond Historical Society and Museum!

The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889. The rush began at "high noon on April 22,1889," and over 50,000 people came to claim their land! In May of the same year, the land they claimed officially became Oklahoma territory. Come see our exhibit about the first Edmond settlers at the Edmond Historical Society and Museum!

Th e Oklahoma Land Rush - A gunshot fired. A cannon roared. Horses startled and wagons sprang to life. On April 22, 1889, settlers flooded into the region of central Oklahoma known as the Unassigned Lands. President Benjamin Harrison signed a proclamation on March 23, 1889, opening the land and people came from across the country to claim it. According to the Homestead Act of 1862, if a settler could stay on the land he claimed for five years and improve it, it would be his free and clear.

Th e Oklahoma Land Rush - A gunshot fired. A cannon roared. Horses startled and wagons sprang to life. On April 22, 1889, settlers flooded into the region of central Oklahoma known as the Unassigned Lands. President Benjamin Harrison signed a proclamation on March 23, 1889, opening the land and people came from across the country to claim it. According to the Homestead Act of 1862, if a settler could stay on the land he claimed for five years and improve it, it would be his free and clear.

Oklahoma history: This image has conflicting information. The captions ran as if this was the Land Run of 1889, when in fact, it was the Land Run of 1893.

Land Run Gallery - Photo Gallery

Oklahoma history: This image has conflicting information. The captions ran as if this was the Land Run of 1889, when in fact, it was the Land Run of 1893.

Oklahoma Land Run 1889  (This is where it started... not with me of course!)

Oklahoma Land Run 1889 (This is where it started... not with me of course!)

On this day in history, September 16, 1893: The Cherokee Strip Land Rush, a race to stake a claim on this valuable strip of Oklahoma land, began. It was one of the last land rushes in the United States. Photo courtesy of the Cherokee Strip Land Rush Museum.

On this day in history, September 16, 1893: The Cherokee Strip Land Rush, a race to stake a claim on this valuable strip of Oklahoma land, began. It was one of the last land rushes in the United States. Photo courtesy of the Cherokee Strip Land Rush Museum.

Cherokee Strip Land Rush - The last great land rush into Indian Territory was held September 16, 1893. Arkansas City, Kansas, had a population of about 100,000 and upon the firing of a gun at noon the population dropped to 5,000, as men, women, and children raced to claim land for their own.

Cherokee Strip Land Rush - The last great land rush into Indian Territory was held September 16, 1893. Arkansas City, Kansas, had a population of about 100,000 and upon the firing of a gun at noon the population dropped to 5,000, as men, women, and children raced to claim land for their own.

Land Runs, Women in | Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

Land Runs, Women in | Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

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