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Explore Ward Cherokee, Cherokee Lineage, and more!

Eliwohi-ama - An Amayinehi, (Cherokee fey,) specifically a Nvnehi, or Wild Cousin associated with water, Eliwohi-ama is powerful and wise.  She is the sister of Tal, and the daughter of Tsasi.  Her uncle is the chief of the local Wild Cousins, known only as Nvna-Adado, or the Stone Spirit.  Like that of her Uncle, Ama's "name" is not actually a name at all, but a descriptive epithet used as a Speaking Name.

Eliwohi-ama - An Amayinehi, (Cherokee fey,) specifically a Nvnehi, or Wild Cousin associated with water, Eliwohi-ama is powerful and wise. She is the sister of Tal, and the daughter of Tsasi. Her uncle is the chief of the local Wild Cousins, known only as Nvna-Adado, or the Stone Spirit. Like that of her Uncle, Ama's "name" is not actually a name at all, but a descriptive epithet used as a Speaking Name.

Chuck Norris - American matial artist and actor - Cherokee Tribe.  My fourth cousin once removed!

Chuck Norris - American matial artist and actor - Cherokee Tribe. My fourth cousin once removed!

Women Warriors - photo series by E. Katie Holm: Nanye-hi (Nancy Ward). America, c.1738 - 1822. "Nanye-hi was a Cherokee Indian who became a “Beloved Woman” after an act of bravery during battle. Beloved Women headed the Council of Women and voted in the Council of Chiefs. They also decided the fate of prisoners, and Nanye-hi’s skillful negotiations helped save many lives. She struggled for peaceful co-existence between the Cherokee and white settlers." http://www.ekatieholm.com

Women Warriors - photo series by E. Katie Holm: Nanye-hi (Nancy Ward). America, c.1738 - 1822. "Nanye-hi was a Cherokee Indian who became a “Beloved Woman” after an act of bravery during battle. Beloved Women headed the Council of Women and voted in the Council of Chiefs. They also decided the fate of prisoners, and Nanye-hi’s skillful negotiations helped save many lives. She struggled for peaceful co-existence between the Cherokee and white settlers." http://www.ekatieholm.com

°Medicine Wheel: The significance of the medicine wheel is one that goes back to the beginning. The medicine wheel connects an understanding of every aspect of ourselves & our lives... Each direction has a individual spirit that helps us know what is there. There being our future, our past & our present. With the spirits of that direction brings us to a knowing & helps us when we are in need, or appreciating what we have... It's all there, all for us to have, if we are willing to accept it.

°Medicine Wheel: The significance of the medicine wheel is one that goes back to the beginning. The medicine wheel connects an understanding of every aspect of ourselves & our lives... Each direction has a individual spirit that helps us know what is there. There being our future, our past & our present. With the spirits of that direction brings us to a knowing & helps us when we are in need, or appreciating what we have... It's all there, all for us to have, if we are willing to accept it.

Nancy Ward, Wild Rose of the Cherokee, was a friend of the pioneer who served as a peacemaker between the settlers and the Indians.  With her trade beads, red tail hawk headdress and Cherokee pottery, she is the focal point of Ben Hamptons first montage.  Completing the petroglyph, are Fort Marr, a covered wagon, a Cherokee Council meeting and the tavern on the banks of the Ocoee where Nancy Ward spent her last years.  A monument marks her burial site in Polk County, Tennessee.

Nancy Ward, Wild Rose of the Cherokee, was a friend of the pioneer who served as a peacemaker between the settlers and the Indians. With her trade beads, red tail hawk headdress and Cherokee pottery, she is the focal point of Ben Hamptons first montage. Completing the petroglyph, are Fort Marr, a covered wagon, a Cherokee Council meeting and the tavern on the banks of the Ocoee where Nancy Ward spent her last years. A monument marks her burial site in Polk County, Tennessee.

Nancy Ward's real name was Nanye'hi. She was an Native American Cherokee Princess whose husband was killed by the British allied Creek Indians. Nanye'hi befriended, protected and saved hundreds of colonists during the Revolutionary War!

Nancy Ward's real name was Nanye'hi. She was an Native American Cherokee Princess whose husband was killed by the British allied Creek Indians. Nanye'hi befriended, protected and saved hundreds of colonists during the Revolutionary War!

At the beginning of the 1830s, nearly 125,000 Native Americans lived on millions of acres of land in GA, Tenn., Alabama, N. Carolina and Florida.   Working on behalf of white settlers who wanted to grow cotton on the Indians’ land, the fed. gov. forced them to leave their homelands and walk thousands of miles to a specially designated “Indian territory” across the Miss. River. This difficult and deadly journey is known as the Trail of Tears.

At the beginning of the 1830s, nearly 125,000 Native Americans lived on millions of acres of land in GA, Tenn., Alabama, N. Carolina and Florida. Working on behalf of white settlers who wanted to grow cotton on the Indians’ land, the fed. gov. forced them to leave their homelands and walk thousands of miles to a specially designated “Indian territory” across the Miss. River. This difficult and deadly journey is known as the Trail of Tears.