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Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) reveals a crown, a scepter and a unique, 10-foot-long silk cloth.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) reveals a crown, a scepter and a unique, 10-foot-long silk cloth.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) Henry’s head was boiled after his death to better preserve it. The skull will now allow researchers to reconstruct the facial features of the emperor.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) Henry’s head was boiled after his death to better preserve it. The skull will now allow researchers to reconstruct the facial features of the emperor.

Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) Son of Henry VI of Luxembourg and Beatrice d'Avesnes. Husband of Margaret of Brabant. *House of Luxemburg* In a private collection.

Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) Son of Henry VI of Luxembourg and Beatrice d'Avesnes. Husband of Margaret of Brabant. *House of Luxemburg* In a private collection.

GERMANY - HEINRICH VII VON LUXEMBOURG CROWN (ca. 1310) : Crown of Henry VII of Luxembourg (1275 - August 23, 1313), King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor, found in his tomb (in Pisa Cathedral - Italy). Grave was opened October 2013 and artifacts cataloged.

GERMANY - HEINRICH VII VON LUXEMBOURG CROWN (ca. 1310) : Crown of Henry VII of Luxembourg (1275 - August 23, 1313), King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor, found in his tomb (in Pisa Cathedral - Italy). Grave was opened October 2013 and artifacts cataloged.

A unique silk cloth has been found in the tomb of German king and Holy Roman emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg (1275-1313), among bones and what remains of his boiled head, Italian researchers announced this week.

A unique silk cloth has been found in the tomb of German king and Holy Roman emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg (1275-1313), among bones and what remains of his boiled head, Italian researchers announced this week.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) “We do not know if the cloth belonged to Henry .... or was specially made for the burial in Pisa Cathedral two years after the emperor’s death. Perhaps the inscription, once decoded, will provide some clues,” Brunori said.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) “We do not know if the cloth belonged to Henry .... or was specially made for the burial in Pisa Cathedral two years after the emperor’s death. Perhaps the inscription, once decoded, will provide some clues,” Brunori said.

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) “The lions, the most characteristic emblem of sovereignty, as well as other decorations symbolizing power, indicate a clear link to the emperor. What makes this cloth unique is its size, the very high level of craftsmanship and its amazing preservation,” Moira Brunori, at the Center for Textile Restoration in Pisa

Exhuming the sarcophagus of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII (1275-1313) “The lions, the most characteristic emblem of sovereignty, as well as other decorations symbolizing power, indicate a clear link to the emperor. What makes this cloth unique is its size, the very high level of craftsmanship and its amazing preservation,” Moira Brunori, at the Center for Textile Restoration in Pisa

Henry VII (1275 - 1313). Holy Roman Emperor from 1308 until his death in 1313. He was the first Emperor from the House of Luxembourg.

Henry VII (1275 - 1313). Holy Roman Emperor from 1308 until his death in 1313. He was the first Emperor from the House of Luxembourg.

Holy RomanEmperor Henry VII (1275-1313). The reconstructed skeleton has allowed the researchers to establish that the subject was a male 5 feet 5 inches tall who died at about 40. Analysis has so far revealed a high concentration of arsenic in the bones, which could support the poisoning theory, although many drugs at that time were arsenic based.  UNIVERSITY OF PISA

Holy RomanEmperor Henry VII (1275-1313). The reconstructed skeleton has allowed the researchers to establish that the subject was a male 5 feet 5 inches tall who died at about 40. Analysis has so far revealed a high concentration of arsenic in the bones, which could support the poisoning theory, although many drugs at that time were arsenic based. UNIVERSITY OF PISA

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