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  • Liz Burnside

    Detail of a portrait of Sir Francis Walsingham, circa 1587, by John de Critz. NPG, London. Queen Elizabeth's Spymaster

  • Marie In Virginia

    Sir Francis Walsingham, brilliant spy master to Queen Elizabeth I.

  • Autumn Ryan

    This painting is of Queen Elizabeth’s spy master, the ruthless Francis Walsingham. Walsingham ran a vast network of spies and secret informers, who helped bring about the execution of Elizabeth's arch rival, Mary Queen of Scots, and played a key role in the defeat of the Spanish Armada. But Elizabeth was strangely reluctant to fund his secret service, and Walsingham was forced to sink much of his personal wealth into the operation.

Related Pins

Princess Elizabeth’s, later Queen Elizabeth I, letter to her sister Queen Mary I. Written just before she was taken to the Tower.

Tudor and Stuart Royals, a painting at Leeds Castle Henry VII; Henry VIII; Edward VI; Mary I; Elizabeth I; James I; Henry, Prince of Wales; Charles I; Anne of Denmark; Frederick V, King of Bohemia; Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia

  • Darla Ng

    I'm descended from royalty, but it didn't change anything in my reality.

The Tomb of Lady Catherine Grey (1540 - 1568) and Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford (1539-1621) Salisbury Cathedral. The younger sister of Lady Jane Grey, Catherine was a granddaughter of Henry VIII's sister Mary, and a potential successor to her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I of England, but incurred Elizabeth's wrath by her secret marriage to Edward Seymour, 1st Earl of Hertford.

Napkin owned by Elizabeth I depicting Anne Boleyn's badge Napkin of linen damask made for Queen Elizabeth I sometime during her reign. It depicts the arms of Elizabeth’s mother, Anne Boleyn (Henry VIII’s second wife). The napkin contains the words ‘Quene Elizabeth’ and ‘God save the Quene’ and a crowned Tudor rose. Victoria and Albert Museum.

Portrait of William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I's chief Councillor and friend, who was one of the most powerful and successful political figures of the Tudor period.

Queen Victoria at Aston Hall ( I see a little bit of the future QE2 in this Queen's candid look).

Edward VI, King of England/••••of "The King's Speech" fame. Queen Elizabeth II's father.

Portrait of Elizabeth I commissioned by Robert Dudley

Statue of Queen Elizabeth I at St Dunstans-in-the-West - the only known to have been carved during her lifetime.

BEAUTIFUL DETAIL OF 16TH CENTURY DOCUMENT THAT DESCRIBES THE EVENTS OF QUEEN ELIZABETH I'S CORONATION. PRESERVED BEAUTIFULLY. WOW.

King James VI of Scotland inherited the kingship as an infant when Mary abdicated in 1567. Regents governed in his name during his minority, which ended in 1581. When Queen Elizabeth died childless in 1603, James VI of Scotland also became James I of England, uniting the crowns of the two countries for the first time in history.

Queen Elizabeth oak, Northiam, East Sussex, UK, you might think this 1,000 year old tree is just a tree but it's a very special tree! When Queen Elizabeth I journeyed to Rye on August 1573 she sat under this tree and ate a meal. She changed her shoes of green damask silk with a 2 5" heel and pointed toe and left them behind as a memento of her visit. They are still in existence and are shown on special occasions. They are kept at Brickwall a Jacobean House in the village