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Toad Lily: They are perennial herbaceous plants that grow naturally at the edge of forests. They prefer shade or part shade and rich, moist soil. Toad Lilies bloom in the fall. They are hardy enough to handle sudden changes of winter from mild to blustery cold.

Toad Lily: They are perennial herbaceous plants that grow naturally at the edge of forests. They prefer shade or part shade and rich, moist soil. Toad Lilies bloom in the fall. They are hardy enough to handle sudden changes of winter from mild to blustery cold.

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Edible Wild Plants: 19 Wild Plants You Can Eat to Survive in the Wild

Cheap dinner - field-penny-cress-close-up

Iris pseudacorus is a species of Iris, native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa. Common names include yellow iris and yellow flag. Its specific epithet, meaning "false acorus," refers to the similarity of its leaves to those of Acorus calamus, as they have a prominently veined mid-rib and sword-like shape. Grows best in very wet conditions, and is often common in wetlands, where it tolerates submersion, low pH, and anoxic soils. The plant spreads quickly, by both rhizome and…

Iris pseudacorus is a species of Iris, native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa. Common names include yellow iris and yellow flag. Its specific epithet, meaning "false acorus," refers to the similarity of its leaves to those of Acorus calamus, as they have a prominently veined mid-rib and sword-like shape. Grows best in very wet conditions, and is often common in wetlands, where it tolerates submersion, low pH, and anoxic soils. The plant spreads quickly, by both rhizome and…

The common name for this shrub is Elderberry, though it is also known as Black/Common/American Elder (as usual, there are different varieties).  This plant can be considered a shrub or a small tree, growing up to 20 feet high (and 15-20 feet wide).  It is often found along wood edges, under power lines and along fences, and even in partially sunny woodland.  The main reason for this is because this is where birds pass the seeds from its fruit.

The common name for this shrub is Elderberry, though it is also known as Black/Common/American Elder (as usual, there are different varieties). This plant can be considered a shrub or a small tree, growing up to 20 feet high (and 15-20 feet wide). It is often found along wood edges, under power lines and along fences, and even in partially sunny woodland. The main reason for this is because this is where birds pass the seeds from its fruit.

Bittercress (Cardamine cordifolia);(C.breweri) or (C.pensylvanica)

Bittercress in Northwest Territories (Edibility and Identification)

Mule Ears Flower

Mule Ears Flower

Wild Columbine.  A nodding, red and yellow flower with upward spurred petals alternating with spreading, colored sepals and numerous yellow stamens hanging below the petals.  This beautiful woodland wildflower has showy, drooping, bell-like flowers equipped with distinctly backward-pointing tubes, similar to the garden Columbines.  The tubes contain nectar that attracts long-tongued insects especially adapted for reaching the sweet secretion.

Wild Columbine. A nodding, red and yellow flower with upward spurred petals alternating with spreading, colored sepals and numerous yellow stamens hanging below the petals. This beautiful woodland wildflower has showy, drooping, bell-like flowers equipped with distinctly backward-pointing tubes, similar to the garden Columbines. The tubes contain nectar that attracts long-tongued insects especially adapted for reaching the sweet secretion.

Large-flowered beard-tongue:  Upland prairies, often sandy soil. American Indian toothache remedy.

Large-flowered beard-tongue: Upland prairies, often sandy soil.

Stork's-bill Erodium Cicutarium      leaves are edible raw.     leaves are best when young.     leaves have a sharp flavour similar to parsley.     leaves are suitable as a potherb.

Stork's-bill Erodium Cicutarium leaves are edible raw. leaves are best when young. leaves have a sharp flavour similar to parsley. leaves are suitable as a potherb.

Northern Pitcher plant.  A carnivorous plant with a large, solitary, purplish-red flower on a leafless stalk rising above a rosette of bronzy, reddish-green, hollow, inflated, curved leaves.  A striking plant with lipped, pitcher-like leaves that collect water; organisms attracted to the colored lip have difficulty crawling upward because of the recurved hairs and eventually fall into the water and drown.

Northern Pitcher plant. A carnivorous plant with a large, solitary, purplish-red flower on a leafless stalk rising above a rosette of bronzy, reddish-green, hollow, inflated, curved leaves. A striking plant with lipped, pitcher-like leaves that collect water; organisms attracted to the colored lip have difficulty crawling upward because of the recurved hairs and eventually fall into the water and drown.

Showy Goldenrod tends to bloom a little later than most Goldenrods. It is indeed one of the showiest of the genus with a feathery plume comprised of a dense clump of pale yellow to deep yellow flowers atop an attractive red stem.

Showy Goldenrod tends to bloom a little later than most Goldenrods. It is indeed one of the showiest of the genus with a feathery plume comprised of a dense clump of pale yellow to deep yellow flowers atop an attractive red stem.

Packera aurea (formerly Senecio aureus), commonly known as golden ragwort or simply ragwort, is a perennial flower in the family Asteraceae. It is also known as golden groundsel, squaw weed, life root, golden Senecio, uncum, uncum root, waw weed, false valerian, cough weed, female regulator, cocash weed, ragweed, staggerwort, and St. James wort. It is native to eastern North America, from Labrador to MN and from NC to AR (with additional populations in the panhandle of FL.

Packera aurea (formerly Senecio aureus), commonly known as golden ragwort or simply ragwort, is a perennial flower in the family Asteraceae. It is also known as golden groundsel, squaw weed, life root, golden Senecio, uncum, uncum root, waw weed, false valerian, cough weed, female regulator, cocash weed, ragweed, staggerwort, and St. James wort. It is native to eastern North America, from Labrador to MN and from NC to AR (with additional populations in the panhandle of FL.

Showy Goldenrod tends to bloom a little later than most Goldenrods. It is indeed one of the showiest of the genus with a feathery plume comprised of a dense clump of pale yellow to deep yellow flowers atop an attractive red stem.

Showy Goldenrod tends to bloom a little later than most Goldenrods. It is indeed one of the showiest of the genus with a feathery plume comprised of a dense clump of pale yellow to deep yellow flowers atop an attractive red stem.

The garden pansy flower is two to three inches in diameter and has two slightly overlapping upper petals, two side petals, and a single bottom petal with a slight beard emanating from the flower's center. These petals are usually white or yellow, purplish, or blue.[3] The plant may grow to nine inches in height, and prefers sun to varying degrees and well-draining soils.

The garden pansy flower is two to three inches in diameter and has two slightly overlapping upper petals, two side petals, and a single bottom petal with a slight beard emanating from the flower's center. These petals are usually white or yellow, purplish, or blue.[3] The plant may grow to nine inches in height, and prefers sun to varying degrees and well-draining soils.

Pink Ladyslipper.  A leafless stalk bears 1 flower (rarely 2) with a distinctive pink, inflated, slipper-like lip petal, veined with read and with a fissure down the front.  this is one of the largest native Orchids and is found both in low, sandy woods and in highter, rocky woods of mountains.  These Orchids propagate poorly and are very difficult to grow in wildflower gardens.  The genus name derives from the Latin for "Venus' slipper."

Pink Ladyslipper. A leafless stalk bears 1 flower (rarely 2) with a distinctive pink, inflated, slipper-like lip petal, veined with read and with a fissure down the front. this is one of the largest native Orchids and is found both in low, sandy woods and in highter, rocky woods of mountains. These Orchids propagate poorly and are very difficult to grow in wildflower gardens. The genus name derives from the Latin for "Venus' slipper."

7dada399a8cb93ba3a8c7de343259f81.jpg 640×960 pixels

7dada399a8cb93ba3a8c7de343259f81.jpg 640×960 pixels

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