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Civic center - this is a good place to kiss The world around us is plastered with messages telling us how to dress, what to drink, and how to behave. The DETOUR 2012 exhibition, Design Renegade, is an experiment in reclaiming our public space, to restore a sense of dignity, curiosity, and basic empathy. #detour2012

The world around us is plastered with messages telling us how to dress, what to drink, and how to behave. DETOUR 2012, Design Renegade, is an experiment in reclaiming our public place, to restore a sense of dignity, curiosity, and basic empathy. Crying in Public is an experiment in defining the city by our emotions. Through a series of street signs, stickers, and chalkboards, passers-by are prompted to pause, reflect, and consider their emotional connection to the city: “Where was the last…

The world around us is plastered with messages telling us how to dress, what to drink, and how to behave. The DETOUR 2012 exhibition, Design Renegade, is an experiment in reclaiming our public space, to restore a sense of dignity, curiosity, and basic empathy.Through a series of street signs, stickers, and chalkboards, passers-by are prompted to pause, reflect, and consider their emotional connection to the city.#detour2012 #detourhk #aod #artwork #designer #creative #creation #outdoor…

Crying in Public by Civic Center The world around us is plastered with messages telling us how to dress, what to drink, and how to behave. The DETOUR 2012 exhibition, Design Renegade, is an experiment in reclaiming our public space, to restore a sense of dignity, curiosity, and basic empathy.#detourhk #detour2012 #aod

from Matador Network

Art in subway stations around the world

Over 100 individual miniature bronze sculptures make up Tom Otterness' Life Underground series, a 2001 public artwork series created for the 14th Street–Eighth Avenue New York City Subway station. The artist was inspired by political cartoonist Thomas Nast, and the project took 10 years. Photo: Micke Kazarnowicz