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  • Jacqui Goldsmith

    Billie Holiday: In 1957, Holiday performed at the Sugar Hill nightclub in Newark, New Jersey. That same year, she performed at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island.

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Billie Holiday by Roy DeCarava in the Photographs Dept.

i cover the waterfront • billie holiday

Billie Holiday. A woman with a traumatic childhood, an unloving family and was forced into prostitution. She used her talent and sang her way to fame. Loved for her individual style and phrasing she became the queen of blues recognised for her signature mechalcholic ballads. Her life was cut short after several abusive husbands and an addiction to drugs. The worls has never been the same. #womenwhochangedtheworld

Billie Holiday ( April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959) was an American jazz singer and songwriter. Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. Critic John Bush wrote that Holiday "changed the art of American pop vocals forever." She co-wrote only a few songs, but several of them have become jazz standards, notably "God Bless the Child", "Don't Explain", "Fine and Mellow".

Billie Holiday in Paris, photographed by Jean-Pierre Leloir, 1958.

"If you copy, it means you're working without any real feeling. No two people on earth are alike, and it's got to be that way in music or it isn't music." —Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday | Music Biography, Streaming Radio and Discography | AllMusic

...died to soon. The beautiful. The talented. The tragic...Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday, 1958 “I’ve been told that nobody sings the word ‘hunger’ like I do. Or the word ‘love.’ Maybe I remember what those words are all about. Maybe I’m proud enough to want to remember Baltimore and Welfare Island, the Catholic institution and the Jefferson Market Court, the sheriff in front of our place in Harlem and the towns from coast to coast where I got my lumps and scars, Philly and Alderson, Hollywood and San Francisco, every damn bit of it." - Lady Sings the Blues (1956)