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High chest of drawers, 1730–50 Boston Walnut, walnut veneer, white pine; 90 x 44 x 22 1/4 in. (228.6 x 111.8 x 56.5 cm) Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1909 (10.125.62) In the 1730s, Boston cabinetmakers transformed the traditional flat-topped, turned-leg, William and Mary–style high chest into the scroll-topped, cabriole-leg Queen Anne version. The best examples of this uniquely American design have carved-and-gilded shells and delicate inlaid stars.

Side chair marked by Michael Smith, 1775-1800, New York City. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Empire Style, 1800–1815 | Thematic Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Empire Style, 1800–1815 | Thematic Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

American Furniture, 1730–1790: Queen Anne and Chippendale Styles | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

1817 American (New York) Card table at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

1815-1820 American (Maryland) Side chair at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

1735-1760 American (New Hampshire or Maine) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

18th century French Side chair at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Chippendale Mahogany Tilt-Top Piecrust Tea Table Philadelphia, circa 1765 H. 28 ½ in.; Diam. 30 ½ in. David L. Barquist, in "Treasures of the State," attributes this table, another at the Rhode Island School of Design, and the example illustrated from the collection of the U.S. State department to the same workshop.