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In 1948, President Harry Truman built a second-story balcony on the South Portico of the White House. The presumption at the time was so prevalent that 1948 Republican presidential candidate Thomas Dewey would unseat Truman in the fall election that Dewey supporters mocked Truman for redecorating a home he would soon be vacating. It didn’t work out that way, of course.

In 1948, President Harry Truman built a second-story balcony on the South Portico of the White House. The presumption at the time was so prevalent that 1948 Republican presidential candidate Thomas Dewey would unseat Truman in the fall election that Dewey supporters mocked Truman for redecorating a home he would soon be vacating. It didn’t work out that way, of course.

Barriers: Harvey Milk's first campaign button, when he ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1973, is worn by a guest as she arrives for the Los Angeles premiere of the film 'Milk' at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California November 13, 2008. The movie is about Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official

Fasen-nating! Campaign buttons stick through generations of politics from Abraham Lincoln to Mitt Romney

Barriers: Harvey Milk's first campaign button, when he ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1973, is worn by a guest as she arrives for the Los Angeles premiere of the film 'Milk' at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California November 13, 2008. The movie is about Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official

“The rise of Alfred E. Smith had no exact parallel in American history. There have been country boys in plenty, such as Lincoln and Garfield, who rose to the heights, but no other city urchin, earning a precarious living in the streets in his early days, ever rose so superior to his lack of youthful advantages and had so distinguished a public career.” - The New York Times, on the passing of Al Smith in 1944.

“The rise of Alfred E. Smith had no exact parallel in American history. There have been country boys in plenty, such as Lincoln and Garfield, who rose to the heights, but no other city urchin, earning a precarious living in the streets in his early days, ever rose so superior to his lack of youthful advantages and had so distinguished a public career.” - The New York Times, on the passing of Al Smith in 1944.

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