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  • Kathryn Bastas

    The American Civil War illustrates how gender roles can be transformed when circumstances demand that women be allowed to enter into previously male-dominated positions of power and independence. This was the first time in American history that women played a significant role in a war effort, and by the end of the war the notion of true womanhood had been redefined.

  • Ancestry Official

    Is there a woman in your family tree who fought in the Civil War? Kady Brownell enlisted w/ her husband in the 1st RI Infantry Volunteers the day after Fort Sumter fell. She fought openly alongside her husband in several battles. At the end of a 3-month enlistment, Kady and her husband re-enlisted in the 5th RI Infantry. Robert was wounded in the battle at New Bern, NC, and the Brownells were transferred to NY where Robert recuperated. Both were discharged winter of 1863.

  • G ґ ε ʇ ɔ н ε η * B╚ ḯ Ⓣ ẕ

    Kady Brownell was one of several women who enlisted with their husbands in the Civil War. She joined the 1st Rhode Island Infantry Volunteers the day after Fort Sumter fell, and fought alongside her husband in several battles, including the first Battle of Bull Run. Robert was wounded in the battle at New Bern, North Carolina, and the Brownells were transferred to New York while he recuperated. They were discharged in the winter of 1863.

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Kady Brownell ~ one of 250 women who fought in the Civil War. When the Civil War began, Brownell’s soon-to-be husband, Robert Brownell, enlisted in the 1st Rhode Island Infantry; Brownell was determined to join him. Rhode Island Governor William Sprague accepted her into his unit.

MILLER, B.F. GUNSHOT WOUND OF LEFT SIDE. Company C, 1st Rhode Island CAVALRY

Civil War CDV, 11th Indiana Volunteer Infantry by hoosiermarine, via Flickr

Worn by Pvt. Jediah K. Burnham, who joined the Keystone Zouaves, Company A of the 76th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry in 1863.

Francis Edwin Brownell (1840 – March 15, 1894) was a soldier and recipient of the Medal of Honor for killing James W. Jackson, after he shot Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth, colonel of the 11th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Brownell's actions marked the first action in the American Civil War to merit the award.

Pvt. William Baker Kaericher, 66th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Company I

Civil War Battle Flag of the 7th Pennsylvania Reserves (36th PA Volunteers)

Francis Edwin Brownell (1840 – March 15, 1894) was a soldier and recipient of the Medal of Honor for killing James W. Jackson, after he shot Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth, colonel of the 11th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Brownell's actions marked the first action in the American Civil War to merit the award.

RECOVERY AFTER A PERFORATING GUNSHOT WOUND OF THE ABDOMEN PRODUCING ARTIFICIAL ANUS. DEICHLER, G.P. LT Company I 69th PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS Dr. SEARLE, CHARLES A. Battle of HATCHER'S RUN, VA, MARCH 1865

EXCISION OF THREE AND ONE HALF INCHES OF SHAFT OF HUMERUS. TUCKER, WILLIAM, [E, 049 OHIO VOLUNTEERS]. Wounded at Battle of Stone River, TN. Treated by Dr. Reed Bontecou, Harewood Hospital, Washington, DC

CHARLESWORTH, J.S.P GUNSHOT WOUND OF THE ILIUM. COL 25th OHIO VOLUNTEERS Battle of CROSS KEYS, VA 1862 CSee also P 175 & 1248 BOUND IN AMM, VOL. 13. SEE REPORT OF A.H. HERVETSON. PUB. IN VOICES OF THE CIVIL WAR: SHENANDOAH 1862

Robert Gould Shaw commanded the 54th Massachusetts Infantry, an African American regiment. Shaw had already fought in the battles of Cedar Mountain and Antietam with the 2nd MA Inf. when he took command of the 54th at the age of 25. Shaw was hesitant to leave his comrades for service in a regiment that he doubted would ever see action. Never the less, he would die leading them during their assault on Battery Wagner outside of Chalreston, SC.