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    Kady Brownell enlisted with her husband in the 1st Rhode Island Infantry Volunteers the day after Fort Sumter fell. She fought openly alongside her husband in several battles, including the first Battle of Bull Run. At the end of their 3-month enlistment, Kady and her husband re-enlisted in the 5th RI Infantry. Robert was wounded in the battle at New Bern, North Carolina, and the Brownells were transferred to New York while Robert recuperated. Both were discharged in the winter of 1863.

    An unidentified Civil War women's volunteer unit of 24 women

    Baby girl Zintkala Nuni (Little Lost Bird) survivor of Wounded Knee massacre, found on battle field is being held by Gen. Colby of Nebraska State Troops, 1890.

    The only woman buried in the Special Forces cemetery at Fort Bragg, NC. Martha Raye

    This is a picture of General Robert E Lee with Traveller. Great story follows.

    Edmund Ruffin fired the first shot at Fort Sumter, officially kicking off the Civil War. With Lee's Surrender at Appomattox, Ruffin committed Suicide, Shooting himself in the head. Hence, he is often associated with shooting the first and last shots of the Civil War. Picture ca. 1860-65

    The Minnesota starvation experiment: During World War Two, conscientious objectors in the US and the UK were asked to volunteer for medical research. In one project in the US, young men were starved for six months to help experts decide how to treat victims of mass starvation in Europe.

    Annie Edson Taylor was an American adventurer who, on her 63rd birthday, October 24, 1901, became the first person to survive a trip over Niagara Falls in a barrel. She is pictured with the cat she sent over the falls in the barrel a few days earlier to test its strength.

    A haunting 150-year-old photo found in a North Carolina attic shows a young black child named John, barefoot and wearing ragged clothes, perched on a barrel next to another unidentified young boy. In April, the photo was found at a moving sale in Charlotte, accompanied by a document detailing the sale of John for $1150.00 not a small sum in 1854.

    Pinner says: 14-year-old Orion Perseus Howe not only was a Union drummer boy in the 55th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, he was also a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions at Vicksburg.

    Pioneer women... Far from the popular image of the helpless, domesticated Victorian women, these pioneer wives were the equals of their husbands, and were completely necessary for their family’s survival. Needing courage, resourcefulness, intelligence and stamina, these women were remarkable for their strength, faith and tenacity.

    Edward Black, drummer boy for the 21st Indiana Volunteers. At 8 years old, it is believed that he was the youngest Union army soldier.

    Here´s another, rarely seen photo of Lincoln (possibly by Preston Butler) made in May 1860, just after Lincoln clinched the nomination.

    Vivandieres have an interesting role in the American Civil War. These brave women traveled with soldiers as mascots or nurses; there are even cases where they fought alongside their male counterparts. A vivandiere could provide creature comforts to the soldiers. Officially during the Civil War, the term Vivandiere is usually applied only to women who served with Zouaves.

    EVELYN NESBIT --Known to millions before her 16th birthday in 1900, Evelyn was the most photographed woman of her era, an iconic figure who set the standard for female beauty. Her jealous millionaire husband, Harry K. Thaw, killed her lover, Stanford White, the architect of much of New York. She found herself at the center of the Crime of the Century and the star of a great courtroom drama.

    Sgt. William H. Carney won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Civil War on July 18, 1863 (the first Black soldier to receive the coveted award). Sargent Carney, a member of the 54th Massachusetts Colored infantry was wounded twice during the charge on Fort Wagner, S.C. while rescuing the Union Flag.

    Some of the most compelling — and frequently heartbreaking — pictures made between 1861 and 1865, while battles raged between the North and the South. Pictured: A former slave reveals the scars on his back from whippings before he escaped to become a Union soldier.

    The women who fought as men: Rare American Civil War pictures show how females disguised themselves so they could go into battle

    Lillian Russell. A plus size beauty in the late 1800s. She was around 200 lb at the peak of her career. She was considered "The American Beauty."

    Nellie Bly (real name Elizabeth Jane Cochran, above) was a 23-year-old journalist without a job when she walked into the offices of Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World in 1887 and was given the daunting assignment of exposing the horrors of the Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum. She rehearsed feverishly. She played mad. “Undoubtedly demented… a hopeless case,” said one of the doctors who admitted her. But inside the asylum she chronicled the awful food and awful conditions that spurred reform.

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton - instrumental in helping pass a law allowing women to own their own property (passed in New York in 1848)