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The History Place - Child Labor in America 1908-12: Lewis Hine Photos - Faces of Lost Youth. Faces of Lost Youth: Doffer boys. Macon, Georgia.

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

Britain's child slaves: They started at 4am, lived off acorns and had nails put through their ears for shoddy work. Yet, says a new book, their misery helped forge Britain

U.K. Industrial Revolution, XIX Century. Child chimney sweeps often had to crawl through holes only 18in wide - and cruel masters would light fires to make them climb faster. Many fell to their deaths

A young girl enjoys a cup of tea courtesy of the advancing Allied armies in a sector of Europe now cleared of Hitler's troops. 1944.

Welcome Home, November 24, 1945.... These women were true heroes! No phone calls, no email, no video chat, weeks or months between letters, no idea when their soldier would be home.... They sucked it up, drove on and got the job done! I don't know how I would have done it, had I been in their position. It's already so hard just being apart.

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

Britain's child slaves: They started at 4am, lived off acorns and had nails put through their ears for shoddy work. Yet, says a new book, their misery helped forge Britain

Child workers in the industrial revolution.

The Mill: Some boys and girls were so small they had to climb up on to the spinning frame to mend broken threads and to put back the empty bobbins. Bibb Mill No. 1. Macon, Georgia.

"1909, family without father. All the children but the 4 smallest work in the cotton mill. Each child makes 4.50 a week."

Faces of the Depression- January, 1937 Looking closely at the full size photo, I'm amazed by the large muscular fingers and hands of the boy. His eyes show concern with a serious glare and his mother, with bruised leg, recognizes him with her extended arm. The children of the depression had to grow up faster than any other generation in recent history. Part of the family of a migrant fruit worker from Tennessee, camped near the packinghouse in Winter Haven, Florida." by Arthur Rothstein