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“I saw that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all sorts of social wrongs. I knew at that point I had to have a camera.” – Gordon Parks ~ Segregation history, Gordon parks. 1956

“I saw that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all sorts of social wrongs. I knew at that point I had to have a camera.” – Gordon Parks ~ Segregation history, Gordon parks. 1956

The famed photographer's LIFE magazine images document the lives of an extended African-American family in 1950s segregated Alabama

The famed photographer's LIFE magazine images document the lives of an extended African-American family in 1950s segregated Alabama

History doesn't forget.  Photo by Flip Schulke, "Student at Montgomery High School protest intergration, 1963"

History doesn't forget. Photo by Flip Schulke, "Student at Montgomery High School protest intergration, 1963"

“I saw that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all sorts of social wrongs. I knew at that point I had to have a camera.” – Gordon Parks ~ Segregation history, Gordon parks. 1956

“I saw that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all sorts of social wrongs. I knew at that point I had to have a camera.” – Gordon Parks ~ Segregation history, Gordon parks. 1956

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

Hope and patience are two sovereign remedies for all, the surest reposal, the softest cushions to lean on in adversity.  —Robert Burton  This, too, shall pass.    Photo by Gordon Parks

Hope and patience are two sovereign remedies for all, the surest reposal, the softest cushions to lean on in adversity. —Robert Burton This, too, shall pass. Photo by Gordon Parks

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in jail in Birmingham, Alabama, April 1963.  In response to criticisms from local clergy that a man of the cloth should not encourage his followers to break the law, King famously penned his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" from this cell.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in jail in Birmingham, Alabama, April 1963. In response to criticisms from local clergy that a man of the cloth should not encourage his followers to break the law, King famously penned his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" from this cell.

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