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First Black women to vote in Ettrick, Virginia, 1920 These women, left to right, are Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter, Odelle Green, Virginia Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer, and Nannie Nichols,

6 year old Ruby Bridges was the first black child in the south to attend a white school after the forced integration following the landmark ruling of Brown Vs. The Board of Education. A willing participant in her mother's decision that she would go and endure what was to be sure a very tough road in the name of helping forge the path of the civil rights movement, Ruby faced death threats and intense bullying with courage and grace.

Annie Malone, the country’s first African American millionaire. (1927) Malone built a very successful business creating hair care products for African American women. In 1918, Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade school to train beauticians barbers as well as secretaries bookkeepers to work on the marketing side of the business. Poro was so successful that by the 1930s Malone was one of the wealthiest African American women in the world. Missouri History Museum

Spelman College in Atlanta, one of the oldest historically Black colleges for women, was established as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary in 1881. The school began with just 11 African American women, and after expanding, received support from John D. Rockefeller, eventually being renamed after his wife, abolitionist Laura Spelman. (Photo shows Spelman grads in 1892)

Hazel Scott was one of the most prominent African Americans of the 1930s, 40s and 50s. One of the premier pianists of her time, she traveled the world playing classical and jazz music. Scott began appearing in films in the 1940s and by the 1950s was such a popular presence that she earned the distinction of becoming the first Black woman to host her own television show, The Hazel Scott Show, which aired in 1950.

Barack Obama at Harvard Law School in 1990 --- First black person elected to be the President of the Harvard Law School Review. #Greatness

Jewel S. LaFontant-MANkarious (1922-1997), A.B. Oberlin 1943, '79 hon., trustee 1981-86. She was the first African American woman to serve as assistant U.S. attorney and the first African American woman to argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Huffington Postfrom The Huffington Post

10 African American Women Who Changed the World

This is the great Maya Angelou! Reading her poetry took my reading to another level. I was like who wrote this stuff. A lot of her poems hit me right in the soul. "Still I Rise," is probably my favorite poem that she wrote. There are so many of her poems that I like. She's an inspiration!

SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 1860 -1900 (21)...........Free at last, behind a fence

Alice Coachman, 88. High Jump. Coachman was the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal, and the only female American athlete to win gold in track and field at the 1948 Games

Phillis Wheatley - Americas - 1773: Wheatley was the first black woman to publish a book. Born in Senegambia, she was sold into slavery at the age of 7 and transported to North America. She was purchased by a family who taught her to read and write and encouraged her poetry. The publication of her "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral" brought her fame in both England and the American Colonies. #womens #history #medieval era #black #women #authors

Daphne Maxwell Reid She was actually the First Black woman named Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University, and the First Black woman to grace the cover of Glamour Magazine. Mom in Fresh Prince Of BelAir

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first black American woman to receive a four-year college degree. Born in Cleveland on Oct. 16, 1831, she entered Oberlin College in the mid-1840s. She became president of the Oberlin Ladies Literary Society and in 1850 delivered the graduation address entitled "A Plea For The Oppressed," an anti-slavery speech.

Delilah L. Beasley. "She was the first black woman to write regularly for a major daily newspaper when her celebrated column, 'Activities Among Negroes' started in the Oakland Tribune in 1923. She continued her careful coverage of the black community until shortly before her death in 1934. She was instrumental in persuading the national press to stop using racial slurs...[and] became an outspoken activist for civil rights for both black people and women."

Thelma Johnson Streat was the first African American woman to have a painting exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, in 1942.

Midnight Train to Georgia | 1942 A group of African American women waiting for their trains at the Pennsylvania railroad station, New York City, 1942. Sepia tone (original b). by Black History Album, via Flickr

Shirley Chisholm (1924 - 2005) "Unbought and Unbossed" Chisholm was the first African American woman in Congress, a 1972 candidate for president, and a life long advocate for women's and civil rights.

Jezebelfrom Jezebel

The Way We Were: Life Magazine Photos Of Women In The 1950s

Seven African American teens walking the steps to the school, while the white students are watching on during the demonstration regarding school integration. 1956.

Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher 1948 Ada Lois Sipuel When denied admission on the basis of race, Fisher filed a suit asserting that she must be admitted to the OU Law School since there was no comparable facility for African American students. Losing in state courts, Marshall argued the case before the Supreme Court which reversed the lower courts in 1948