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First Black women to vote in Ettrick, Virginia, 1920 These women, left to right, are Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter, Odelle Green, Virginia Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer, and Nannie Nichols,

Spelman College in Atlanta, one of the oldest historically Black colleges for women, was established as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary in 1881. The school began with just 11 African American women, and after expanding, received support from John D. Rockefeller, eventually being renamed after his wife, abolitionist Laura Spelman. (Photo shows Spelman grads in 1892)

Hazel Scott was one of the most prominent African Americans of the 1930s, 40s and 50s. One of the premier pianists of her time, she traveled the world playing classical and jazz music. Scott began appearing in films in the 1940s and by the 1950s was such a popular presence that she earned the distinction of becoming the first Black woman to host her own television show, The Hazel Scott Show, which aired in 1950.

Annie Malone was the country’s first African American millionaire. Malone built a very successful business creating hair care products for black women. In 1918, Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade school to train beauticians and barbers, as well as secretaries and bookkeepers to work on the marketing side of the business. Poro was so successful that by the 1930s Malone was one of the wealthiest African American women in the world. (Missouri History Museum, 1927)

6 year old Ruby Bridges was the first black child in the south to attend a white school after the forced integration following the landmark ruling of Brown Vs. The Board of Education. A willing participant in her mother's decision that she would go and endure what was to be sure a very tough road in the name of helping forge the path of the civil rights movement, Ruby faced death threats and intense bullying with courage and grace.

Barack Obama at Harvard Law School in 1990 --- First black person elected to be the President of the Harvard Law School Review. #Greatness

Black Female Equestriansfrom Black Female Equestrians

DeBoraha Akin-Townson (Barrel Racing)

DeBoraha Akin (Townson) became the first Black cowgirl to compete in the International Professional Rodeo Finals in 1990. Today she is the only African American Woman to compete with a professional card in the WPRA (Women’s Professional Rodeo Association) at PRCA rodeos throughout the United States.

The Huffington Postfrom The Huffington Post

10 African American Women Who Changed the World

Poetry: "i know why the caged birds sing" of Maya Angelou, #MayaAngelou #cagedbirdsings

Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first female pilot of African American descent[1] and the first person of African American descent to hold an international pilot license.[2][3]

American freedom fighter and orator, Sojourner Truth (pron.: /soʊˈdʒɜrnər ˈtruːθ/; c. 1797 – November 26, 1883) was the self-given name, from 1843 onward, of Isabella Baumfree, an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son, she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

About.com Educationfrom About.com Education

Women Welders - 1943

images of women welders | the Riveter Picture Gallery - Women Welders - African American Women ...

Midnight Train to Georgia | 1942 A group of African American women waiting for their trains at the Pennsylvania railroad station, New York City, 1942. Sepia tone (original b). by Black History Album, via Flickr

Private Cathay Williams was the only woman to serve in the US Army as a Buffalo Soldier. On November 15, 1866 she enlisted in the Army as a man. Williams reversed her name William Cathay and lived as a male soldier and served until she was found out due to the last of many illnesses she suffered while a serving. She is the only documented black woman known to have served in the Army during these times when enlisting women was prohibited

Poet, Phyllis Wheatley, born into slavery in 1753 in Boston MA. First African American woman to have her writings published

U.S. Marshals escorting the brave Ruby Bridges. One of the first African Americans to attend a white school.

Julia Ward Howe -wrote the words to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" .She was inspired by her abolitionist work . The song was popular in the union during the civil war. After being widowed she worked tirelessly for womens sufferage . She became a pacifist because of her horror at the Civil War carnage.

Coal miners display bombs dropped by the govt of United States on its own citizens during the Battle of Blair Mountain, the largest armed uprising in the US after the Civil War. "For five days in 1921, in Logan County, West Virginia, between 10,000 and 15,000 coal miners confronted an army of 30,000 police and strikebreakers backed by coal operators... The battle ended after approximately one million rounds were fired, and the United States Army intervened by presidential order."