Detail from The New Zealander, 1872, by Gustave Dore. By 1865 Punch magazine, referring to Macaulay’s (1840) reference to “some traveller from New Zealand [who] shall, in the midst of a vast solitude, take his stand on a broken arch of London Bridge to sketch the ruin of St Paul’s”, declared that “Macaulay’s New Zealander” headed the list of a number of clichés that were henceforth to be outlawed as “used up, exhausted, threadbare, stale and hackneyed”

Detail from The New Zealander, 1872, by Gustave Dore. By 1865 Punch magazine, referring to Macaulay’s (1840) reference to “some traveller from New Zealand [who] shall, in the midst of a vast solitude, take his stand on a broken arch of London Bridge to sketch the ruin of St Paul’s”, declared that “Macaulay’s New Zealander” headed the list of a number of clichés that were henceforth to be outlawed as “used up, exhausted, threadbare, stale and hackneyed”

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