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Calligrapher: unknown. India. 17th-18th centuries. 12.5 x 24.8 cm. Indian ta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and Middle Eastern Division.

Calligrapher: Abu al-Ma'ali. Iran. 16th-17th centuries. 18.7 (w) x 12 (h) cm. Nasta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and Middle Eastern Division.

This calligraphic fragment includes an exercise in nasta'liq script that consists in combining letters (mufraddat) in various formations. This particular fragment bears witness to the practice of mufraddat exercises in nasta'liq script that seems to have existed among calligraphers active in 18th-century India. Calligrapher: unknown. India. 18th century. 40.6 x 19.7 cm. Nasta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and Middle Eastern Division.

This calligraphic fragment includes a number of poetical verses written diagonally, horizontally, and vertically in separate panels of beige and gold paper. Calligrapher: Muhyi. Iran. 1550-1600 A.D. 12.5 x 21 cm. Nasta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and Middle Eastern Division.

This calligraphic panel includes three iambic pentameter quatrains, or ruba'is, on beige or blue papers cut out and pasted onto a sheet from an album (muraqqa') of calligraphies. Calligrapher: unknown. Uzbekistan. 16th century. 14.1 x 24.5 cm. Nasta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and Middle Eastern Division.

Shaykh Sa'di (d. 691/1292) composed his famous "Gulistan" (The Rose Garden) in 654/1256. His work includes eight chapters, an introduction and a conclusion. Each chapter narrates a number of stories, maxims and admonitions. This fragment is the first page of the Gulistan's introduction, initiated at the top by a bismillah and followed by Sa'di's praise of God. Calligrapher: unknown. India. 18th century. 8.7 x 17.5 cm. Indian ta'liq script. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, African and…

Royal Picnic Object Name: Single Work Date: ca. 1590–95 Geography: India, Deccan, Ahmadnagar Culture: Islamic Medium: Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper Dimensions: Image/Folio: 8 1/16 × 11 13/16 in. (20.5 × 30 cm) Frame: 24 × 20 1/16 × 1 in. (61 × 51 × 2.5 cm) Classification: Codices Credit Line: The British Library

A small, unnamed ~18th century album of pencil and watercolour sketches is hosted online among the prints and photographs in Gallica, the digitised collection at Bibliothèque nationale de France. subjects = Mughal emperors and Hindu gods. originating in the Indian subcontinent, the date range of the drawings at between the early 1600s and late 1700s. album was once owned by 19th century French polymath Egyptologist, Émile Prisse d'Avennes