From the Mapuru 2005 Report by Diane Moon. She was one of six participants in the weaving workshops held at Mapuru, northeast Arnhem Land, in August 2005. "For weavers, a trip to the bush always includes the search for dye stuffs. One of the most important dyes in Arnhem Land is the strong yellow obtained from djundum (Pogonolobus reticulatus). Djundum is a small, straggly, tree which to around a meter and has coarse, slightly rough leaves.

From the Mapuru 2005 Report by Diane Moon. She was one of six participants in the weaving workshops held at Mapuru, northeast Arnhem Land, in August 2005. "For weavers, a trip to the bush always includes the search for dye stuffs. One of the most important dyes in Arnhem Land is the strong yellow obtained from djundum (Pogonolobus reticulatus). Djundum is a small, straggly, tree which to around a meter and has coarse, slightly rough leaves.

Ingrid Hoffman (Arts QLD) and Mavis Ngallametta (Aurukun) CIAF Ghost Net display 09.  photo courtesy Gina Allain

Ingrid Hoffman (Arts QLD) and Mavis Ngallametta (Aurukun) CIAF Ghost Net display 09. photo courtesy Gina Allain

Arnhem Weaving Workshop 2007, "She would gently take my basket, and quietly and quickly tighten, straighten, coil and stitch it into a manageable shape again. The young women, their granddaughters, would chat about colours and styles, and help us with the difficult parts." Estelle Roberts

Arnhem Weaving Workshop 2007, "She would gently take my basket, and quietly and quickly tighten, straighten, coil and stitch it into a manageable shape again. The young women, their granddaughters, would chat about colours and styles, and help us with the difficult parts." Estelle Roberts

tayenebe workshop,   Fiona Maher picking white flag iris (Diplarrena moraea)  Photograph: Anne O’Connor, Courtesy TMA  Videos of the workshops can be viewed at http://static.tmag.tas.gov.au/tayenebe/workshops/video/index.html

tayenebe workshop, Fiona Maher picking white flag iris (Diplarrena moraea) Photograph: Anne O’Connor, Courtesy TMA Videos of the workshops can be viewed at http://static.tmag.tas.gov.au/tayenebe/workshops/video/index.html

Cecilia Peter making basket, Pormpuraaw workshop 09. Photo courtesy Sue Ryan.

Cecilia Peter making basket, Pormpuraaw workshop 09. Photo courtesy Sue Ryan.

Our Vision  Bawaka Cultural Experiences Women’s Program, is a gift of friendship,  knowledge and strength to women visitors.  This program will build a positive future for our children and grandchildren, by  strengthening our culture and creating economic independence.  Our vision holds all women and families, our country our culture, our knowledge and our stories.

Our Vision Bawaka Cultural Experiences Women’s Program, is a gift of friendship, knowledge and strength to women visitors. This program will build a positive future for our children and grandchildren, by strengthening our culture and creating economic independence. Our vision holds all women and families, our country our culture, our knowledge and our stories.

Arnhem Weaving Workshop 2008, "The women and their families made me and the other Balanda women feel something more than what Balanda culture would call ‘welcome’: they invited us to live with them as they lived their daily lives and, through this, allowed us to feel a special connection with them." Kristina, workshop participant

Arnhem Weaving Workshop 2008, "The women and their families made me and the other Balanda women feel something more than what Balanda culture would call ‘welcome’: they invited us to live with them as they lived their daily lives and, through this, allowed us to feel a special connection with them." Kristina, workshop participant

Arnhem Weavers Workshop 2004, On our way out to buffalo country we stopped to dig for djundum, a root used to make a precious yellow dye. The ground is very hard and a long metal rod is used to dig it out. Back at camp the root is scraped, put into large tins with water and boiled up." from blog by tour participant Jan Lewis.

Arnhem Weavers Workshop 2004, On our way out to buffalo country we stopped to dig for djundum, a root used to make a precious yellow dye. The ground is very hard and a long metal rod is used to dig it out. Back at camp the root is scraped, put into large tins with water and boiled up." from blog by tour participant Jan Lewis.

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