The Ruins of St. Paul's was once a 16th-century complex of St. Paul's College and the Cathedral of St. Paul which is also known as Mater Dei.  The cathedral was one of the largest Catholic churches in Asia built by the Jesuits during the years 1582 to 1602.  Unfortunately, the cathedral was destroyed by a fire during a typhoon in 1835 and what remains now is only its facade.  The facade sits on top of a small hill with 66 stone steps leading up to it.

The Ruins of St. Paul's was once a 16th-century complex of St. Paul's College and the Cathedral of St. Paul which is also known as Mater Dei. The cathedral was one of the largest Catholic churches in Asia built by the Jesuits during the years 1582 to 1602. Unfortunately, the cathedral was destroyed by a fire during a typhoon in 1835 and what remains now is only its facade. The facade sits on top of a small hill with 66 stone steps leading up to it.

The Ruins of St. Paul's refers to the ruins of a 16th-century complex in Macau including of what was originally St. Paul's College and the Cathedral of St. Paul also known as "Mater Dei", a 17th-century Portuguese cathedral dedicated to Saint Paul the Apostle

The Ruins of St. Paul's refers to the ruins of a 16th-century complex in Macau including of what was originally St. Paul's College and the Cathedral of St. Paul also known as "Mater Dei", a 17th-century Portuguese cathedral dedicated to Saint Paul the Apostle

St. Paul's College - The Jesuit university in Macau, China

St. Paul's College - The Jesuit university in Macau, China

The Ruins of St Paul refers to the facade of what was originally the Church of Mater Dei built in 1602-1640. Destroyed by fire in 1835, the Ruins also refer to the ruins of St Paul’s College, which stood adjacent to the Church. As a whole, the old Church of Mater Dei, St Paul’s College and Mount Fortress were perceived as Macau’s “acropolis”. Today, the Ruins of St Paul are one of Macau’s most famous landmarks, and in 2005 were officially enlisted as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Ruins of St Paul refers to the facade of what was originally the Church of Mater Dei built in 1602-1640. Destroyed by fire in 1835, the Ruins also refer to the ruins of St Paul’s College, which stood adjacent to the Church. As a whole, the old Church of Mater Dei, St Paul’s College and Mount Fortress were perceived as Macau’s “acropolis”. Today, the Ruins of St Paul are one of Macau’s most famous landmarks, and in 2005 were officially enlisted as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Beside St. Paul’s is the must-see Macau Museum, ensconced in the bowels of Mount Fortress, built in the early 1600s as the city’s primary military defense with supplies to survive a two-year siege.

Macau Map - a walk around St Paul's Ruins

Beside St. Paul’s is the must-see Macau Museum, ensconced in the bowels of Mount Fortress, built in the early 1600s as the city’s primary military defense with supplies to survive a two-year siege.

Macau walking map around St Paul's Ruins.

Macau Map - a walk around St Paul's Ruins

Near the top of the hill is a grand set of stone stairs leading to Macau’s most famous landmark, the Ruins of St. Paul’s

Macau Map - a walk around St Paul's Ruins

Near the top of the hill is a grand set of stone stairs leading to Macau’s most famous landmark, the Ruins of St. Paul’s

Traveling Macau without visiting the Ruins of St Paul literally means not visiting Macau attractions at all. It is one of the most visited Macau attraction. Originally built in 17th century, it was destroyed by fire in 1835 & what remains till today is the facade of the Church & St Paul’s college.

Traveling Macau without visiting the Ruins of St Paul literally means not visiting Macau attractions at all. It is one of the most visited Macau attraction. Originally built in 17th century, it was destroyed by fire in 1835 & what remains till today is the facade of the Church & St Paul’s college.

Macau’s most famous site is the façade of the Jesuit-built St. Paul’s College, destroyed by fire in 1835. The college was the first Western-style university in the Far East, and the façade is a fascinating mix of religious and Eastern symbolism.

Macau’s most famous site is the façade of the Jesuit-built St. Paul’s College, destroyed by fire in 1835. The college was the first Western-style university in the Far East, and the façade is a fascinating mix of religious and Eastern symbolism.

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