As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, Susie King Taylor was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences.

As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, Susie King Taylor was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences.

Barbara Ross-Lee, D.O., Sister of Diana Ross was the first African American woman to be appointed dean of an American medical school.

Barbara Ross-Lee, D.O., Sister of Diana Ross was the first African American woman to be appointed dean of an American medical school.

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first African-American woman to get a four year college degree. She graduated in 1850

Lucy Ann Stanton, the first African-American woman to get a four year college degree. She graduated in 1850

Francine Everett (April 13, 1915 – May 27, 1999) was an African-American actress and singer who is best known for her performances in race films, independently produced motion pictures with all-black casts that were created exclusively for distribution to cinemas that catered to African American audiences. She studied and acted with the Federal Theater in Harlem, which was sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.

Francine Everett (April 13, 1915 – May 27, 1999) was an African-American actress and singer who is best known for her performances in race films, independently produced motion pictures with all-black casts that were created exclusively for distribution to cinemas that catered to African American audiences. She studied and acted with the Federal Theater in Harlem, which was sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.

Journalist Ed Bradley  Bradley, the first African American at CBS to be a White House correspondent and a Sunday night anchor, covered a broad array of stories with insight and aplomb during his 39-year career, from war to politics to sensitive portraits of artists. He won virtually every broadcast news award -- some of them more than once.

Journalist Ed Bradley Bradley, the first African American at CBS to be a White House correspondent and a Sunday night anchor, covered a broad array of stories with insight and aplomb during his 39-year career, from war to politics to sensitive portraits of artists. He won virtually every broadcast news award -- some of them more than once.

HARRIET AND JOHN TUBMAN: The only photo held representing the likeness of Harriet's first husband, John Tubman, a free black man of Maryland, killed after Harriet's escape to freedom. Harriet's age in photo is about 30 years. Around 1844, she married a free black man, John Tubman. Since she was a slave, there could be a chance that she could be sold; he reportedly told her that he would tell "massa" if she tried. Her goal to achieve freedom was too large for her to give up though. In 1849…

HARRIET AND JOHN TUBMAN: The only photo held representing the likeness of Harriet's first husband, John Tubman, a free black man of Maryland, killed after Harriet's escape to freedom. Harriet's age in photo is about 30 years. Around 1844, she married a free black man, John Tubman. Since she was a slave, there could be a chance that she could be sold; he reportedly told her that he would tell "massa" if she tried. Her goal to achieve freedom was too large for her to give up though. In 1849…

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