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John Lewis (left) and Hosea Williams, leaders of the Voting Rights campaign in Selma Alabama in February-March 1965. Both men were later elected to the US House of Representatives from Georgia. : Stock Photo

John Lewis (left) and Hosea Williams, leaders of the Voting Rights campaign in Selma Alabama in February-March 1965. Both men were later elected to the US House of Representatives from Georgia. : Stock Photo

Praying/Preaching a sermon of freedom on a cold winter day. From left, John Lewis of SNCC (kneeling), Hosea Williams of SCLC (kneeling), and Andy Young of SCLC (standing). Movement headquarters Brown Chapel is in the background.

Praying/Preaching a sermon of freedom on a cold winter day. From left, John Lewis of SNCC (kneeling), Hosea Williams of SCLC (kneeling), and Andy Young of SCLC (standing). Movement headquarters Brown Chapel is in the background.

Fifty years ago on March 7, civil rights activists John Lewis and the Rev. Hosea Williams led 600 people on a march from Selma, Alabama, to the capitol in Montgomery. Stopped by a gang of state police and white civilians on the Edmund Pettus Bridge outside of Selma, they were...

Why the Civil Rights Legacy of Selma Is Waning Once Again

Fifty years ago on March 7, civil rights activists John Lewis and the Rev. Hosea Williams led 600 people on a march from Selma, Alabama, to the capitol in Montgomery. Stopped by a gang of state police and white civilians on the Edmund Pettus Bridge outside of Selma, they were...

Edmund Pettus Bridge - Just before the marchers are attacked.  Congressman John Lewis in front in white coat.

Edmund Pettus Bridge - Just before the marchers are attacked. Congressman John Lewis in front in white coat.

On March 7, 1965, 600 civil rights protesters attempted a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the state capital, to draw attention to the voting rights issue. Led by Hosea Williams of SCLC and John Lewis of SNCC, the marchers encountered Alabama state troopers and local police officers who gave them a two-minute warning to stop and turn back. When the protesters refused, the officers tear-gassed and beat them. Over 50 people were hospitalized. National Archives Identifier 16899041

On March 7, 1965, 600 civil rights protesters attempted a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the state capital, to draw attention to the voting rights issue. Led by Hosea Williams of SCLC and John Lewis of SNCC, the marchers encountered Alabama state troopers and local police officers who gave them a two-minute warning to stop and turn back. When the protesters refused, the officers tear-gassed and beat them. Over 50 people were hospitalized. National Archives Identifier 16899041

John Lewis reflects on Selma: 'I thought I saw death'~ Rep. John Lewis reflects on the severe beating he received at the hands of the state police. (WXIA) When we got to the edge of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, Hosea looked down at the Alabama River. “John, can you swim?” he said. “No. Hosea,” I said. ” Can you?” “Yes. ” “We’re not going to jump,” I said. “We’re not going back. We’re going to move forward.” And that’s what we did."~Congress John Lewis, Dec. 25, 2014. [extract Time.com]

John Lewis reflects on Selma: 'I thought I saw death'~ Rep. John Lewis reflects on the severe beating he received at the hands of the state police. (WXIA) When we got to the edge of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, Hosea looked down at the Alabama River. “John, can you swim?” he said. “No. Hosea,” I said. ” Can you?” “Yes. ” “We’re not going to jump,” I said. “We’re not going back. We’re going to move forward.” And that’s what we did."~Congress John Lewis, Dec. 25, 2014. [extract Time.com]

John Lewis, Coretta Scott King, Hosea Williams and Julian Bond registering black voters in GA.

John Lewis, Coretta Scott King, Hosea Williams and Julian Bond registering black voters in GA.

"BLOODY SUNDAY", MARCH 7, 1965  |  HOSEA WILLIAMS (left) and JOHN LEWIS of SNCC, leading more than 500 people across EDMUND PETTUS BRIDGE from SELMA, heading to MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA, on March 7, 1965.  Peaceful marchers protesting the shooting death of JIMMY LEE JACKSON were assaulted by law enforcement. (The Birmingham News file)

Selma to Montgomery march will target immigration, voter ID laws

"BLOODY SUNDAY", MARCH 7, 1965 | HOSEA WILLIAMS (left) and JOHN LEWIS of SNCC, leading more than 500 people across EDMUND PETTUS BRIDGE from SELMA, heading to MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA, on March 7, 1965. Peaceful marchers protesting the shooting death of JIMMY LEE JACKSON were assaulted by law enforcement. (The Birmingham News file)

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