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Hotel Chevillon, Grez, 1883 by Sir John Lavery (Irish 1856-1941) ....although Irish, Lavery spent much of his formative life and career in Scotland and was a central figure of The Glasgow Boys...

Hotel Chevillon, Grez, 1883 by Sir John Lavery (Irish 1856-1941) ....although Irish, Lavery spent much of his formative life and career in Scotland and was a central figure of The Glasgow Boys...

My Lady And Her Children

John Callcott Horsley (1817 – 1903, English)

Claude Monet - Woman in the Garden

Art Print: Woman in the Garden by Claude Monet

Madame et Monsieur Monet. “Every day I discover more and more beautiful things. It’s enough to drive one mad. I have such a desire to do everything, my head is bursting with it.”

Madame et Monsieur Monet. “Every day I discover more and more beautiful things. It’s enough to drive one mad. I have such a desire to do everything, my head is bursting with it.”

A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time. Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows - Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945. S)

Before alarm clocks there were knocker-upper's. Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows. Limehouse Fields. London. . Undated. Photograph from Philip Davies' Lost London: 1870 - 1945.

A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time. Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows - Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945. S)

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