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Find is 'whopper in size', says amateur fossil hunter

BBC News - Find is 'whopper in size', says amateur fossil hunter

The quintessential Australian Dinosaur, an opalised femur or thigh bone of a hypsilophodontid dinosaur from Lightning Ridge Photographer: John Broomfield

Atopodentatus unicus - Atopodentatus is an extinct genus of marine reptile, possibly basalsauropterygian, known from the early Middle Triassic (Pelsonian substage, Anisian stage) of Luoping County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. It contains a single species, Atopodentatus unicus.It is thought to have lived between 247 and 242 million years ago, during the Middle Triassic period, about six million years after the Permian extinction

Xiphactinus (from Latin and Greek for "sword-ray") is an extinct genus of large (4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) long) predatory marine bony fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous. When alive, the fish would have resembled a gargantuan, fanged tarpon (to which it was, however, not related).The species Portheus molossus described by Cope is a junior synonym of X. audax

Muttaburrasaurus was a genus of herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur, which lived in what is now northeastern Australia sometime between 112 and 99.6 million years ago during the early Cretaceous Period. It has been recovered in some analyses as a member of the iguanodontian family Rhabdodontidae.After Kunbarrasaurus, it is Australia's most completely known dinosaur from skeletal remains. It was named after Muttaburra, the site in Queensland, Australia, where it was found

Xiphactinus (from Latin and Greek for "sword-ray") is an extinct genus of large (4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) long) predatory marine bony fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous. When alive, the fish would have resembled a gargantuan, fanged tarpon (to which it was, however, not related).The species Portheus molossus described by Cope is a junior synonym of X. audax

Archaeopteryx lithographica, fossil single feather found 1860, (This image shows the original fossil - not a cast.) Archaeopteryx lived in the Late Jurassic around 150 million years ago, in what is now southern Germany during a time when Europe was an archipelago of islands in a shallow warm tropical sea, much closer to the equator than it is now. Similar in size to a Eurasian magpie, with the largest individuals possibly attaining the size of a raven

Archaeopteryx lithographica, fossil single feather found 1860, (This image shows the original fossil - not a cast.) Archaeopteryx lived in the Late Jurassic around 150 million years ago, in what is now southern Germany during a time when Europe was an archipelago of islands in a shallow warm tropical sea, much closer to the equator than it is now. Similar in size to a Eurasian magpie, with the largest individuals possibly attaining the size of a raven

Caudipteryx (which means "tail feather") is a genus of peacock-sized theropoddinosaurs that lived in the Aptian age of the early Cretaceous Period (about 124.6 million years ago). They were feathered and remarkably birdlike in their overall appearance. Two species have been described; C. zoui (the type species), in 1998, and C. dongi, in 2000

The claw of Therizinosaurus - Therizinosaurus is a genus of very large theropod dinosaurs. Therizinosaurus comprises the single species T. cheloniformis, which lived in the late Cretaceous Period (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian stages, around 70 million years ago), and was one of the last and largest representatives of its unique group, the Therizinosauria