Explore 7 5 3 Shichi, San Festival, and more!

Shichi-Go-San-Festival-in-Tokyo

Shichi-Go-San-Festival-in-Tokyo

Japanese Culture - Shichi, Go, San - Yuki    This is a photo taken on the Shichi, Go, San festival. Shichi, Go, San is a festival (on November 15th) for children of three, five and seven years of age.

Japanese Culture - Shichi, Go, San - Yuki This is a photo taken on the Shichi, Go, San festival. Shichi, Go, San is a festival (on November 15th) for children of three, five and seven years of age.

七五三Shichi-Go-San (七五三, lit. "Seven-Five-Three") is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for the age of 3, 5 and 7. Boys get their time alone in the spotlight at 5, and girls at 7, held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children.

七五三Shichi-Go-San (七五三, lit. "Seven-Five-Three") is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for the age of 3, 5 and 7. Boys get their time alone in the spotlight at 5, and girls at 7, held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children.

Shichi-go-san is celebrated on Nov. 15 in Japan, celebrating children that are 3, 5, & 7.  The family prays for the happiness and health of their children, then treats them with traditional sweets after.

Shichi-go-san is celebrated on Nov. 15 in Japan, celebrating children that are 3, 5, & 7. The family prays for the happiness and health of their children, then treats them with traditional sweets after.

Japanese people are keenly aware of the four seasons, and the clothes they wear are always in keeping with the season. The Japanese are also very tuned in to the stages of their lives. Special events are held to mark milestones in children's growth, for instance, and people change their kimonos to fit both the season and the occasion. Another key event in a kid's life is the Shichi-Go-San ("seven-five-three") Festival, which takes place in November.

Japanese people are keenly aware of the four seasons, and the clothes they wear are always in keeping with the season. The Japanese are also very tuned in to the stages of their lives. Special events are held to mark milestones in children's growth, for instance, and people change their kimonos to fit both the season and the occasion. Another key event in a kid's life is the Shichi-Go-San ("seven-five-three") Festival, which takes place in November.

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