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Stunning Silurian sea scorpion! Eurypterus lacustris from the Bertie Waterlime of Ontario, Canada

Stunning Silurian sea scorpion! Eurypterus lacustris from the Bertie Waterlime of Ontario, Canada

@maximaxoo:  #History #Science: scientists can finally tell ancient worm's head from its tail ► http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jun/24/ancient-mystery-worm-surprise-eyes-and-teeth-hallucigenia-sparsa … | @guardian

@maximaxoo: #History #Science: scientists can finally tell ancient worm's head from its tail ► http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jun/24/ancient-mystery-worm-surprise-eyes-and-teeth-hallucigenia-sparsa … | @guardian

The USGS Great Lakes Science Center is a buzz over National #PollinatorWeek2014: http://on.doi.gov/1qsIm6P  pic.twitter.com/c85fPQiFYP

The USGS Great Lakes Science Center is a buzz over National #PollinatorWeek2014: http://on.doi.gov/1qsIm6P pic.twitter.com/c85fPQiFYP

This image shows a reconstruction of Dwykaselachus oosthuizeni, a type of symmoriid shark now known to be an early chimaera.

280 million-year-old fossil reveals origins of chimaeroid fishes: Discovery allows scientists to connect the last major vertebrate group to the tree of life

This image shows a reconstruction of Dwykaselachus oosthuizeni, a type of symmoriid shark now known to be an early chimaera.

A tiny fossil fish may be close to the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates:  Metaspriggina

Tiny Fish May Be Ancestor of Nearly All Living Vertebrates

A tiny fossil fish may be close to the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates: Metaspriggina

After the Hangenberg mass extinction, small fish dominated the oceans while larger fish mostly died out.

Ancient mass extinction led to dominance of tiny fish, paleontologist shows

After the Hangenberg mass extinction, small fish dominated the oceans while larger fish mostly died out.

Payara, Hydrolycus scomberoides

7 Sets Of Teeth That An Orthodontist Would Love

Two new plankton-eating fossil fish species of the genus called Rhinconichthys have been discovered from the oceans of the Cretaceous Period, about 92 million years ago, when dinosaurs roamed the planet.

Fossil discovery: Extraordinary 'big-mouthed' fish from Cretaceous Period

Two new plankton-eating fossil fish species of the genus called Rhinconichthys have been discovered from the oceans of the Cretaceous Period, about 92 million years ago, when dinosaurs roamed the planet.

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