Amelia Earhart married George Putnam on February 7, 1931.  Earhart's ideas on marriage were liberal for the time as she believed in equal responsibilities for both "breadwinners" and pointedly kept her own name rather than being referred to as Mrs. Putnam. When The New York Times, per the rules of its stylebook, insisted on referring to her as Mrs. Putnam, she laughed it off. GP also learned quite soon that he would be called "Mr. Earhart."[

Amelia Earhart married George Putnam on February 7, 1931. Earhart's ideas on marriage were liberal for the time as she believed in equal responsibilities for both "breadwinners" and pointedly kept her own name rather than being referred to as Mrs. Putnam. When The New York Times, per the rules of its stylebook, insisted on referring to her as Mrs. Putnam, she laughed it off. GP also learned quite soon that he would be called "Mr. Earhart."[

"...now and then women should do for themselves what men have already done - occasionally what men have not done--thereby establishing themselves as persons, and perhaps encouraging other women toward greater independence of thought and action. Some such consideration was a contributing reason for my wanting to do what I so much wanted to do." - Amelia Earhart #styleicon #modcloth

"...now and then women should do for themselves what men have already done - occasionally what men have not done--thereby establishing themselves as persons, and perhaps encouraging other women toward greater independence of thought and action. Some such consideration was a contributing reason for my wanting to do what I so much wanted to do." - Amelia Earhart #styleicon #modcloth

AMELIA EARHART'S SOLO TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT  On May 20, 1932, American aviator Amelia Earhart embarked on a historic solo transatlantic flight, becoming the first woman to do so. Taking off from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Earhart flew for 14 hours and 56 minutes before landing in a pasture at Culmore in Northern Ireland.

AMELIA EARHART'S SOLO TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT On May 20, 1932, American aviator Amelia Earhart embarked on a historic solo transatlantic flight, becoming the first woman to do so. Taking off from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Earhart flew for 14 hours and 56 minutes before landing in a pasture at Culmore in Northern Ireland.

Amelia Earhart  (1897– disappeared 1937)   Earhart was the first woman to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross,  for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

Amelia Earhart (1897– disappeared 1937) Earhart was the first woman to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross, for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

Amelia Earhart sure was an #ExplorerExtraordinaire! She was the first fancy lady to ever sail across the atlantic.

Amelia Earhart sure was an #ExplorerExtraordinaire! She was the first fancy lady to ever sail across the atlantic.

Amelia Earhart vanished during an attempt to fly around the world.  Newspaper article struggles with and discusses possibilities  of what happened in those final moments as she flew across the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937

Amelia Earhart vanished during an attempt to fly around the world. Newspaper article struggles with and discusses possibilities of what happened in those final moments as she flew across the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937

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