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Idiom of the day: No strings attached.  Meaning: Free of conditions, limitations, obligations, etc.

Idiom of the day: No strings attached. Meaning: Free of conditions, limitations, obligations, etc.

Idiom of the day: Out of the blue. Meaning: Suddenly and unexpectedly. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish #blue

Idiom of the day: Out of the blue. Meaning: Suddenly and unexpectedly. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish #blue

Idiom of the day: Rule of thumb. Meaning: A practical and approximate way of doing or measuring something. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish #ruleofthumb

Idiom of the day: Rule of thumb. Meaning: A practical and approximate way of doing or measuring something. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish #ruleofthumb

Do you keep your nose to the grindstone? -         Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) .   For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu  For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163  Kluceti@chesapeake.edu .  www.chesapeake.edu

Do you keep your nose to the grindstone? - Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) . For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163 Kluceti@chesapeake.edu . www.chesapeake.edu

Idiom of the day: Hard nut to crack.  Meaning: A problem that is hard to solve or a person who is difficult to understand.  Example: Our product sells well in the States, but the European market is a hard nut to crack.

Idiom of the day: Hard nut to crack. Meaning: A problem that is hard to solve or a person who is difficult to understand. Example: Our product sells well in the States, but the European market is a hard nut to crack.

Idiom of the day: By the skin of your teeth.  Meaning: Just barely.  Example: Jack escaped from the burning building by the skin of his teeth.

Idiom of the day: By the skin of your teeth. Meaning: Just barely. Example: Jack escaped from the burning building by the skin of his teeth.

Idiom of the day: Walk in the park.  Meaning: Something very easy to do.  Example:  - How was your test? Was it difficult?  - No. It was a walk in the park because I studied really hard for it.

Idiom of the day: Walk in the park. Meaning: Something very easy to do. Example: - How was your test? Was it difficult? - No. It was a walk in the park because I studied really hard for it.

Useful -        Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) .   For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu  For ESL classes  contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163  Kluceti@chesapeake.edu .  www.chesapeake.edu English

Useful - Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) . For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163 Kluceti@chesapeake.edu . www.chesapeake.edu English

"Drop the ball" means "to make a mistake, to fail".  Example: Thomas dropped the ball when he forgot to pick his girlfriend up at the train station.  #idiom

"Drop the ball" means "to make a mistake, to fail". Example: Thomas dropped the ball when he forgot to pick his girlfriend up at the train station. #idiom

Idiom: Mad as a hatter - In the past, Mercury was used in the making of hats. This was known to have affected the nervous systems of hatters, causing them to tremble and appear insane. Lewis Carroll's 'Hatter' character from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1865, is of course the best-known mad hatter of them all.

Idiom: Mad as a hatter - In the past, Mercury was used in the making of hats. This was known to have affected the nervous systems of hatters, causing them to tremble and appear insane. Lewis Carroll's 'Hatter' character from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1865, is of course the best-known mad hatter of them all.